Altenberg abbey was founded in 1133 as a daughter house of Morimond Abbey and settled initially in the old castle of the Counts of Berg, Burg Berge, which the counts had left for Schloss Burg, but moved to the new purpose-built monastery in the valley of the Dhünn in 1153. It flourished sufficiently to undertake the settlement of a number of daughter houses of its own from 1143 to 1443.

In 1803 it was dissolved during the secularisation of Germany and fell into ruin. Starting in 1847 under King Frederick William IV of Prussia, a thorough restoration was carried out, and the restored church, known as the Altenberger Dom ('Altenberg Cathedral', although Altenberg was never the seat of a bishopric so this is not technically accurate), is now an interdenominational church used by both Roman Catholics and Protestants.

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Details

Founded: 1133
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Kawka (3 years ago)
Nice to visit
Thomas Kusch (3 years ago)
Plain and beautiful monastic gothic cathedral in picturesque setting. Onsite parking is limited, but a larger parking lot is about 500 m away at the nearby Marchenpark (fairy tail park).
Jan Bruder (4 years ago)
Beautiful, tranquil place. Inviting for walks and snacks in picturesque little cafes... Highly recommend.
Jan Arden (4 years ago)
What an amazing place to visit full of ancient sounds and wonder. Forest adorned with dappled sun, fun was had by everyone. Visit anytime of the year for different vibes.
Christine Mullet (5 years ago)
Altenberger dom Any walker would enjoy walk #6 from the Dom. It is a round tour and well signposted going over and through wonderful countryside. This is just one picture.
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