Cathedral of the Holy Trinity

Quebec City, Canada

The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity (Sainte-Trinité) is the cathedral of the Anglican Diocese of Quebec. The Diocese of Quebec was founded in 1793 and its first bishop, Dr. Jacob Mountain, gave his early attention to the erection of a cathedral. The completed building, designed by military officers William Robe and William Hall and built between 1800 and 1804, was consecrated on August 28, 1804. It was the first Anglican cathedral to be built outside of the British Isles.

Designed in the neoclassic Palladian style, the Cathedral was modeled after the St Martin-in-the-Fields Church in Trafalgar Square, London, and the Marylebone Chapel (now known as St Peter, Vere Street). King George IIIpaid for the construction of the Cathedral and provided a folio Bible, communion silverware and large prayer books to be used for worship.

The bell-tower is home to 8 bells, founded by Whitechapel in 1830, and are the oldest change-ringing peal in Canada. Due to deterioration, they were brought down in 2006, sent to Whitechapel in London for retuning, and reinstalled in April 2007.

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Details

Founded: 1800-1804
Category: Religious sites in Canada

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Baltazar Lopez Jimenez (15 months ago)
Beautiful Catholic Cathedral. It also hosts amazing free concerts...
Joseph Freda (17 months ago)
Beautiful church, wonderful concerts.
Dwayne Hewlin (17 months ago)
Nice place to visit.
Scott Keele (18 months ago)
We participated in the tour... that was super fast. 4 stars because I would have loved more time to look around. Fascinating place with some interesting history.
Brendarenda Berry (2 years ago)
The church was open, and I slipped in to take a peak at the interior, intrigued by it being one of the oldest churches in Quebec City. I would have loved to climb to bell tower with its 8 bell chime. Tours are offered if you have the interest and time, and there are some interesting artifacts displayed together. I will take the time to do this if I revisit the city.
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