Cathedral-Basilica of Notre-Dame de Québec

Quebec City, Canada

The Cathedral-Basilica of Notre-Dame de Québec is the oldest church in the Americas north of the Spanish colonies in Florida and New Mexico. It is a National Historic Site of Canada, and located within the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Historic District of Old Québec.

Located on this site since 1647, the cathedral has twice been destroyed by fire throughout the centuries. A previous iteration of the church was destroyed during the Siege of Quebec in 1759. It was rebuilt from plans by Gaspard-Joseph Chaussegros de Léry draughted in 1743. The interior was designed by Jean Baillairgé and his son François from 1786–1822. In 1843, François' son, Thomas, suggested a reconstruction of the façade to resemble the church of Sainte-Geneviève in Paris, resulting in the finest Neo-classic façade in Québec. The cathedral was richly decorated with impressive works of art: baldaquin, canopy, episcopal throne dais, stained glass windows, paintings, and chancel lamp (a gift of Louis XIV).

In 1922 the church was again gutted by fire, this time by the Canadian fraction of the Ku Klux Klan, and restored by architects Maxime Roisin and Raoul Chenevert.Raoul Chenevert added a presbytery beside the Cathedral in 1931-32.

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Founded: 1647
Category: Religious sites in Canada

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Leonard Kasmet (6 months ago)
It wasn’t open when I visited but I enjoyed seeing the outside. It added to the ambiance of old Quebec
Steve Ding (6 months ago)
if you are visiters dont try to get inside. or they will keep on asking you are visiting or messa and asking you leave.
Parth Bhavsar (8 months ago)
Wonderful place. Beautiful drawings on the windows. And the place hase silent effect on you once you enter the Basilica.
Prince Thomas (12 months ago)
It was closed. From outside a magnificent
Nurse Christie (12 months ago)
Was a magnificent experience, love the place so calming and peaceful. Must visit for a Catholic believer like me. Keep the faith in JESUSNAME Blessed and grateful ❤ ?
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