Notre-Dame-des-Victoires Church

Quebec City, Canada

Notre-Dame-des-Victoires is a small Roman Catholic stone church in the Lower Town of Quebec City. Built on the site of Samuel de Champlain’s 1608 Habitation, it is the first permanent French establishment in North America; a symbol of the French presence in North America. The construction was started in 1687 and completed in 1723.

The church was largely destroyed by the British bombardment that preceded the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in September 1759. A complete restoration of the church was finished in 1816. Architect François Baillairgé led the restoration work.

The church, which was listed as a historic monument in 1929, remains a popular tourist attraction within the city, as well as a place of worship. It has undergone extensive restoration in recent decades, to restore its colonial French character. It was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1988 and plaqued in 1992.

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Founded: 1687-1723
Category: Religious sites in Canada

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

marcelo cipriani (18 months ago)
It's a must see religious and historical site.
Jamie Seper (19 months ago)
An amazing ancient church. Takes magnificent pictures. Sooo much history. Amazing.
lili Pashaei (20 months ago)
I was in Quebec city but I haven't had visit inside of Church because it's not open every day and you have to check from website when it will be open. But I have had a very good time there. There are lots of restaurants and Gift shops around Church You can have a rest and see beautiful colorful wall which was history of Quebec. There was a guide who was explaining motifs and characters which were painted on the wall. When you walk in front of wall you think it's real . It's fun to take a photo. Very special experience.
Scott Keele (21 months ago)
Church at the center of lower Quebec City. Wonderful charm! There was a wedding in progress while we were there, otherwise we would have seen the inside. The town square is super picturesque! Relax and enjoy this corner of the world.
Brendarenda Berry (2 years ago)
Right in the heart of old Quebec. It's very busy here, but take a minute and walk through. The unique feature is the wooden ship model suspended from the ceiling. A treasure found in the chapels cellar.
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