Notre-Dame-des-Victoires Church

Quebec City, Canada

Notre-Dame-des-Victoires is a small Roman Catholic stone church in the Lower Town of Quebec City. Built on the site of Samuel de Champlain’s 1608 Habitation, it is the first permanent French establishment in North America; a symbol of the French presence in North America. The construction was started in 1687 and completed in 1723.

The church was largely destroyed by the British bombardment that preceded the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in September 1759. A complete restoration of the church was finished in 1816. Architect François Baillairgé led the restoration work.

The church, which was listed as a historic monument in 1929, remains a popular tourist attraction within the city, as well as a place of worship. It has undergone extensive restoration in recent decades, to restore its colonial French character. It was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1988 and plaqued in 1992.

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Founded: 1687-1723
Category: Religious sites in Canada

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Olivia Oh (2 years ago)
The building itself was beautiful however it wasn’t open when i visited unfortunately. A sign explaining the history or significance of the church would have been nice, because my thought was « oh, it’s a church, ok » without much information. I hope someone post a clear information about visiting hours! Maybe next time I’m in Quebec I’ll be able to see her.
Shafayath Emon (2 years ago)
Looks stunningly beautiful but little disappointed that we couldn't get inside!
Andrea Paganini (2 years ago)
small but very nice church in a very beautiful square
Crystal (2 years ago)
If you can only see a few places during your stay in Old Quebec, make sure that this is one of them. The history of this church alone is worth the visit!
Marat Khoubaev (3 years ago)
Every brick here is so full of history.
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