The City Hall of Quebec City (Hôtel de ville de Québec) was inaugurated on September 15, 1896. The building slopes downward as it was built on a hill and was once home to the Jesuit College (Jesuit Barracks) from the 1730s to 1878.

Designed by architect Georges-Émile Tanguay (1858-1923), it is the second permanent city hall for the old city. From 1842 to 1896 City Hall sat at home of British Army Major General William Dunn. Prior to 1842 the city government sat a various sites. The formal city council was established in 1833.

The building used a mixture of Classical, Medieval and Châteauesque elements.

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Founded: 1896
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Canada

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Orest Omeliukh (13 months ago)
Anybody know the history of the pineapples that are found on the building's roof peaks?
Eric (2 years ago)
Peaceful rest location while sight seeing.
Just one travel lover (2 years ago)
Gorgeous building, colourful decorated at the fall
Albert Liu (2 years ago)
Nice building with good architect
Syed Mushtaq Ali (3 years ago)
They had decorated for the Halloween outside the hotel. This is located near the Chateau Frontnac. It is located in a very peaceful area. I personally like to go here and spend some time on the benches outside the hotel. They even have the water fountains outside. Certainly I did not go inside the hotel. But it really looks magnificent from outside.
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