The City Hall of Quebec City (Hôtel de ville de Québec) was inaugurated on September 15, 1896. The building slopes downward as it was built on a hill and was once home to the Jesuit College (Jesuit Barracks) from the 1730s to 1878.

Designed by architect Georges-Émile Tanguay (1858-1923), it is the second permanent city hall for the old city. From 1842 to 1896 City Hall sat at home of British Army Major General William Dunn. Prior to 1842 the city government sat a various sites. The formal city council was established in 1833.

The building used a mixture of Classical, Medieval and Châteauesque elements.

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Founded: 1896
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Canada

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Im Mina (2 years ago)
Great, Quebec city is best city! 5 out of 5, would vote NO again.
Arafat Hussain Mollik (2 years ago)
Excellent place.
Guillaume Nadeau (3 years ago)
Amazing outside ! Very beautiful and green !
Jorge Trujillo (3 years ago)
Amazing part of History here in Quebec. Great scenery from the inside and outside. Almost like a mini museum for the pronounced Hotel. They must see if you're in Quebec City
kpl karthic (4 years ago)
Beautiful place must see , walking through downtown is must you will love it
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