Fortifications of Québec

Quebec City, Canada

The ramparts of Quebec City are the only remaining fortified city walls in North America north of Mexico. The British began refortifying the existing walls, after they took Quebec City from the French in the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in 1759.

The wall, which runs on the eastern extremity on the Promontory of Quebec, surrounds most of Old Quebec, which was declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO in 1985. The fortifications were designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1948.

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Details

Founded: 1620-1759
Category: Castles and fortifications in Canada

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

a holman (3 years ago)
Lovely!
tiffany daniels (4 years ago)
Excellent place to learn about history, the events are very much entertaining and the place is very well maintained...
Henry Mottesheard (4 years ago)
Great, small museum, hosted by the Government of Quebec’s Park Services, detailing the history of the fortifications and armaments used to protect the city. Many interactive family events, artifacts, and re-enactment movies in both English and French. The Park Services employees were very helpful and knowledgeable about the history of Quebec and were eager to answer any questions. When visiting Old Quebec City, take a moment and drop by this museum.
Molix Rawdi (4 years ago)
Superb lo
Jeff Heskin (5 years ago)
Very interesting and informative museum. Be sure to walk the grounds and parks surrounding the museum and walled in areas. Great views.
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Varberg Fortress

Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

It is currently used as a museum and bed and breakfast as well as private accommodation. The moat of the fortress is said to be inhabited by a small lake monster. In August 2006, a couple of witnesses claimed to have seen the monster emerge from the dark water and devour a duck. The creature is described as brown, hairless and with a 40 cm long tail.