Fortifications of Québec

Quebec City, Canada

The ramparts of Quebec City are the only remaining fortified city walls in North America north of Mexico. The British began refortifying the existing walls, after they took Quebec City from the French in the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in 1759.

The wall, which runs on the eastern extremity on the Promontory of Quebec, surrounds most of Old Quebec, which was declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO in 1985. The fortifications were designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1948.

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Details

Founded: 1620-1759
Category: Castles and fortifications in Canada

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

a holman (21 months ago)
Lovely!
tiffany daniels (2 years ago)
Excellent place to learn about history, the events are very much entertaining and the place is very well maintained...
Henry Mottesheard (2 years ago)
Great, small museum, hosted by the Government of Quebec’s Park Services, detailing the history of the fortifications and armaments used to protect the city. Many interactive family events, artifacts, and re-enactment movies in both English and French. The Park Services employees were very helpful and knowledgeable about the history of Quebec and were eager to answer any questions. When visiting Old Quebec City, take a moment and drop by this museum.
Molix Rawdi (2 years ago)
Superb lo
Jeff Heskin (3 years ago)
Very interesting and informative museum. Be sure to walk the grounds and parks surrounding the museum and walled in areas. Great views.
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