Saorge Monastery

Saorge, France

Saorge was a stronghold of strategic significance defending the road between Nice and Turin via the Col de Tende mountain pass. Recollect Franciscan monks founded a monastery there in 1633, at the time of the Catholic Reformation. Today it overlooks the village and waterfalls of La Roya at the gateway to Mercantour.

The cloister and the refectory contain examples of exceptional painted decoration dating from the 17th and 18th centuries: frescoes depicting the life of Saint Francis of Assisi, allegories of the virtues, sundials and trompe-l’œil features. The church still has its original furniture and magnificent wood carvings. The building is a fine example of the balance between Baroque and sobriety typical of the Franciscan Order.

The harmonious surroundings are set off by huge terraced grounds featuring an orchard and kitchen garden, looking out on to wonderfully untouched mountains.

Occupied by Franciscans until 1988, today the monastery is a residence for writers.

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Address

Munte, Saorge, France
See all sites in Saorge

Details

Founded: 1633
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

www.monastere-saorge.fr

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erich BARTKOWIAK (4 months ago)
Superbe endroit, un guide passionnant avec beaucoup d'humour, je recommande. Une des plus belles vues sur le village de SAORGE.
Richard Marcovich (5 months ago)
Lieu calme et hors du temps. Paysages paradisiaques.
Frédéric Aime (10 months ago)
History under your eyes
Yvonne Delepine (18 months ago)
Lovely place and thé village is nice
Edwin Dingjan (2 years ago)
Very nice, great views, not so big , worth a visit
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