Nice Castle Hill

Nice, France

The Castle of Nice was a citadel used for military purposes. Built at the top of a hill, it stood overlooking the bay of Nice from the 11th century to the 18th century. It was besieged several times, especially in 1543 and in 1691, before it was taken by French troops in 1705 and finally destroyed in 1706 by command of Louis XIV.

Nowadays, Castle Hill is used as a park. It's the most famous public garden in Nice, and a 'must see' place for the numerous tourists who visit the city. It offers many amazing panoramas, and provides a beautiful view all day long from sunrise to sundown, highlighting various landscapes depending on where one looks: the Harbor at sunrise, the Promenade des Anglais at sundown. That's why Castle Hill is called 'the cradle of the sun'.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category:
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stanslous Mukundwa (10 months ago)
Great historical site
Andreea Dumi (11 months ago)
Super Nice this place ❤️❤️❤️????
akanksha bhatnagar (12 months ago)
Amazing view of Nice plus a refreshing waterfall.. Must visit!
Dr Myron Bouray (13 months ago)
Beautiful place, beautiful people!!!
romain maison (13 months ago)
Must do
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