Lumone Tomb is the only remaining vestige of the Roman way station Lumone. The front is in three vaulted arches and traces of fresco decoration are still visible. The tomb was built in the 1st century AD as a way station at the junction of the Via Aurelia and the Via Julia Augusta, and forms part of the Via Julia Augusta archaeological trail.

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Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

More Information

www.rcm-tourisme.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Charles Von Damier (11 months ago)
A good favorite, very pleasant to visit with the family
Gregory Bardus (3 years ago)
It is a small monument on Via Julia that passes from vingtimille to the Turbie
Kritsana Kaewmee (3 years ago)
Ancient places, try to study
Jean Marc (3 years ago)
Excellent rapport qualité prix
trish fell (3 years ago)
This is a beautiful place to visit.. on a warm day.. I would go again if possible
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