Saint-Michel Basilica

Menton, France

Saint-Michel Basilica is a Baroque jewel with its incredible exterior, the bell-tower, the coloured cobbles of the parvis arranged to form the Grimaldi’s coat of arms and the “rampes Saint-Michel” (a series of flights of stairs).

The construction of the Basilica begun in 1640 under the reign of Honoré II, but took several centuries to be completed. The façade was then renovated in the 19th Century adding typical decor of the period such as smooth columns with ionic and corinthian capitals.

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Details

Founded: 1640
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

www.tourisme-menton.fr

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vitalie Crudu (2 years ago)
The Basilica of St. Michael the Archangel was built according to the wishes of Prince Honoré II of Monaco. He wanted a "big and beautiful church to Menton" and made this wish by the Genoese architect Laurent Lavagna. Construction began May 27, 1619, but the real work only began in 1639. In 1653 the monument was officially over and under the cult of Saint Michael the Archangel. It is May 8, 1675 that the bishop of Ventimiglia dedicated this church while the prince Ludwig I was there. A bell tower 53 meters high was built in 1701 by architect Emmanuel Monaco Cantone. It was not until 1819 that the facade was completed in the style of the seventeenth century. Originally this church building was a church, and do not acquire the title of Basilica in March 1999, following a decree of Pope John Paul II to reward the church Menton for its dynamism. In 2006, the square was renovated of 170m ² with no less than 250,000 pebbles! It took a year of work to meet the methods implemented in the eighteenth century is taken into account to implement the central motif. This baroque church welcomes every year more than 100,000 tourists who come to admire its facade, which restored its square are represented the arms of the Grimaldi and its impressive ramp. Finally, in summer, at least in August, the front of the Basilica hosts the Classical Music Festival of Menton.
Melvine Lilechi (3 years ago)
Quite a peaceful place to be.
Vedat Odacı (3 years ago)
The Basilica of St. Michael the Archangel was built according to the wishes of Prince Honoré II of Monaco. He wanted a "big and beautiful church to Menton" and made this wish by the Genoese architect Laurent Lavagna. Construction began May 27, 1619, but the real work only began in 1639. In 1653 the monument was officially over and under the cult of Saint Michael the Archangel. It is May 8, 1675 that the bishop of Ventimiglia dedicated this church while the prince Ludwig I was there. A bell tower 53 meters high was built in 1701 by architect Emmanuel Monaco Cantone. It was not until 1819 that the facade was completed in the style of the seventeenth century. Originally this church building was a church, and do not acquire the title of Basilica in March 1999, following a decree of Pope John Paul II to reward the church Menton for its dynamism. In 2006, the square was renovated of 170m ² with no less than 250,000 pebbles! It took a year of work to meet the methods implemented in the eighteenth century is taken into account to implement the central motif. This baroque church welcomes every year more than 100,000 tourists who come to admire its facade, which restored its square are represented the arms of the Grimaldi and its impressive ramp. Finally, in summer, at least in August, the front of the Basilica hosts the Classical Music Festival of Menton.
Ugo De Menton (3 years ago)
Another must to visit in Menton! A great place in August for live classical concerts for 3 weeks!
Abdallah Bseirani (4 years ago)
We really enjoyed visiting this old basilica in Menton, France. It is being repaired and one should climb many steps to reach it. But it was worth it. We liked it so much that we came back and attended mass on Sunday. It was in French. I was able to follow the mass as I speak French. It is located in the old part of the city, which means we walked quite a bit in the old city and it was very interesting.
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