Vufflens castle was built in 1425 on the site of a previous medieval castle by Henri de Colombier. It is the most significant example of a small group of fortified Romandy castles from the middle ages, characterised above all by its brick construction. In 1530, it was set on fire by Bernese troops. In 1641 it was acquired by the de Senarclens family. The castle is currently privately owned and cannot be visited.

A pleasant 30 minute-walk through the vineyards between Vufflens-le-Château and Denens, offers a stunning view of this magnificent castle, the lake and the Mont-Blanc.

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Details

Founded: 1425
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

www.region-du-leman.ch

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

I_ MM (16 months ago)
I love the library cabin in front of the castle, it is an area with a magical aura
George Kontogouris (3 years ago)
Unique castles just 15min drive from Lausanne. The castle sits among vineyard which makes the whole scenery more impressive
Lee McEwan (3 years ago)
Beautiful location for a walk. The footpaths are well signposted and you get fabulous views of the castle, the lake and the trains as you walk through the surrounding vineyards. No car park but there are sufficient places to park or you can easily come by train.
Gao shengwen (5 years ago)
Very beautifully château in Switzerland
Kent R (6 years ago)
A very beautiful and restored castle, however, it is a private residence and no entry is allowed. Nice to walk through the adjascent town and vineyards for a leisurely day.
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