St. Peter's Cathedral

Geneva, Switzerland

The St. Peter's Cathedral in Geneva is known as the adopted home church of John Calvin, one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. Inside the church is a wooden chair used by Calvin.

St. Peter's Cathedral was build between years 1160-1252, on the place where previously used to stand basilica from the 6th century. Cathedral was rebuilded several times, last reconstructions took place in 18th century. In 1397, the Chapelle des Macchabées was added to the original building and in 1752 the portico was added to the western facade. Interiors of the Cathedral were vastly demolished in 1535, when Geneva's residents accepted the Reformation and destroyed all the altars inside the cathedral, all the statues and most of the paintings in a rage. Luckily the Pulpit and some paintings at the tops of the pillars were preserved.

The cathedral has a old, spacious and rather plain interior, highlighted by shiny candle-like looking chandeliers, with beautiful shrine, several rows of benches and few chapels. Side aisles contains huge stone blocks - tombstones of church dignitaries from 15th and 16th centuries.

On the place of cathedral were recently found remains of basilica that was standing here previously, and mosaic paintings, walls, rooms and flooring from the buildings even several centuries older (dating back to the 4th century). All these historical findings are proving the existence of the city in the antiquity. There is a little museum made on the place of the Archaeological Site open for the public. You can see the artifacts and rooms found here, such as: The Roman Crypt, Monk's Cells, The Allobrogian Tomb and several Audio Shows portraying the history. 

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Details

Founded: c. 1160
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Crausaz Hervé (10 months ago)
To be visited and spare some time for this shiny place
Katarina Schneider (10 months ago)
at the beginning my expectations were about something more prestigious and impressive, but finally it is just a small cathedral. If you are limited of time, just try to enjoy mostly the lake with the birds
Zoe Lopez (Zorolocho) (12 months ago)
Pretty cathedral with a nice tower with an excellent view of geneva. Interesting basement and architecture.
Karim Sadek (2 years ago)
Over 850 years old and still standing strong over a hill in the old town of Geneva. The towers offer great views over the city!
Eva-Maria Messner (2 years ago)
A wonderful church. We collected the last stamp of our 26 day pilgrimage here. Lovely service.
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