The Calvin Auditory (Auditoire de Calvin), originally the Notre-Dame-la-Neuve Chapel, played a significant role in the Protestant Reformation. It is associated with John Calvin, Theodore Beza and John Knox.

The auditorium lies directly adjacent to St. Pierre Cathedral in the Place de la Taconnerie. The austere Gothic-style building was constructed in the 15th century, on the site of earlier 5th-century religious buildings, and was originally dedicated to Notre-Dame-la-Neuve.

From 1536, the time of Geneva's Reformation, it became a lecture hall where Calvin actively expounded his reformed theology. In 1559, it served as the original home of the University of Geneva. Once Geneva accepted the Reformation, it became a haven for Protestant refugees from all over Europe, and Calvin gave this building over for them to worship in their own language. It was also used by the Scottish reformer John Knox, during his exile in Geneva in the 1550s. Here he ministered to an English-speaking refugee congregation and developed many of the ideas that were to be influential in the Scottish Reformation. Subsequently, it became a place used by numerous Protestant refugee groups including Italian Waldensians, Dutch Reformed and Scottish Presbyterians. It is viewed by many Reformed churches throughout the world as a crucible of their faith.

Over the years, the building deteriorated. In 1954, the World Alliance of Reformed Churches reached an agreement with the National Protestant Church of Geneva and launched a programme to restore the auditorium, which was completed in 1959.

Today, following in the tradition established by Calvin, the Auditoire is still used for worship in languages other than French. It hosts congregations of the Dutch Reformed Church and Italian Reformed Church, as well as being used by a congregation of the Church of Scotland as its main place of worship every Sunday.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

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en.wikipedia.org

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Melvin Diaz (2 years ago)
This a nother treasure of the reformation located next to St. Pierre cathedral. This is where John Calvin used to teach. Later, John Knox, another important figure of the reformation, also teached and preached there. There is no entrance fee. Now, this place is used by the church of Scotland in Geneva (Presbyterian). Furthermore, you are welcome to join the Sunday services at 11 am. Very welcoming congregation. Recommended.
Jacques Marty (2 years ago)
lieu mythique avec une qualitée acoustique pour les concerts.
Tif Gds (2 years ago)
C'est à cet endroit que ma remise de diplôme a eu lieu un endroit chargé en émotions, où j'ai passé à ce jour le plus beau moment de ma vie accompagné de toute ma famille et de mon université.
Eric Fauchère (2 years ago)
Important to see it!
Leanne Taylor (3 years ago)
I walked by today (Saturday) and I had the opportunity to hear the church choir practicing. Simply incredible and emotional. I loved it.
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