During the 13th century Dardagny Castle, along with Bruel, La Corbière and Malval, formed a ring of castles, which secured the western boundary of the lands of the Bishop of Geneva. In 1298 there were two castles, which were separated by a small road. Each one belonged to one of the two noble families in Dardagny. In the 14th century, the south building was over two stories high and had a tower.

In 1646, the Favre family inherited both feudal domains in the village. Daniel Favre joined the two castles in 1655 through a gallery. He also built three towers and expanded the entire building. In 1721 Dardagny Castle went to Jean Vasserot who had the courtyard roofed over and converted into a feast hall which was decorated with Italian paintings. In 1740 staircase was built in the small central tower and the received its present appearance. It was purchased in 1904 by the municipality. They restored it in 1926 and 1932, after initially considering demolishing the building. Since then, the building has housed local government and a school.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jacques Strahm (6 months ago)
Magnifique salle de réception
Taina Evans (6 months ago)
The village Chateau, a historical building, now serves as the village school and the mairie. The main reception room is frequently used for weddings.
Steve RODRIGUES (9 months ago)
Superbe endroit!!!
Angie Perez B (14 months ago)
Beautiful Castle! We were there the day of the Caves Ouvertes of Geneva. Tasting amazing Genevoise wines!!!
Leïla Gfeller (3 years ago)
Nice castle, great school and you have to meet the concierge and her family living in the castle (lovely people)
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