Brunswick Monument

Geneva, Switzerland

The Brunswick Monument is a mausoleum built in 1879 in Geneva to commemorate the life of Charles II, Duke of Brunswick (1804–1873). He bequeathed his fortune to the city of Geneva in exchange for a monument to be built in his name, specifying that it be a replica of the Scaliger Tombs in Verona, Italy.

Linguist, musician and knight, the Duke of Brunswick, Charles d’Este-Guelph, was a unique individual indeed. Born in 1804, he was expelled from his duchy in 1830, located in what is now Germany. He fled into exile to various European cities including Paris, where he made a fortune and then moved to Geneva. In 1873, he died and bequeathed his immense fortune to Geneva in exchange for a beautiful funeral and a monument to his name.

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Founded: 1879
Category: Statues in Switzerland

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Slim Lab Zurich (2 years ago)
Was just a great sunny day! Love it!
Shannon Pedersen (2 years ago)
A good place to stop and rest away from the bustle of the walkway. There’s a nice restaurant nearby too. A good place for a quick tourist stop.
Benedict Uy (2 years ago)
Stumbled upon the monument as I was walking along the lake side. The ornate building got my attention so I had to cross the street to get a closer look. It looked like there was a coffin in the mid layer of the structure. There were also quite a few water features around (but they were all off at the time). It was a really interesting stop especially if you enjoy elaborate carvings.
Duncan Agnew (2 years ago)
This is another great photo opportunity in Geneva. It is a fantastic example of extravagant, Neo-Gothic architecture. You can view it from the waterfront, but may prefer to get photos from the park, with the waterfront (and the fountain) as your backdrop. In park grounds, this is a good place to enjoy a stroll or break up a long walk with children.
adari tarun (2 years ago)
Very appealing architecture... It might have been awesome if they would have arranged some lights in the night.
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