The International Monument to the Reformation, usually known as the Reformation Wall, honours many of the main individuals, events, and documents of the Protestant Reformation by depicting them in statues and bas-reliefs.

The Wall is in the grounds of the University of Geneva, which was founded by John Calvin, and was built to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Calvin's birth and the 350th anniversary of the university's establishment. It is built into the old city walls of Geneva, and the monument's location there is designed to represent the fortifications', and therefore the city of Geneva's, integral importance to the Reformation.

Inaugurated in 1909, it was the culmination of a contest launched to transform that part of the park. The contest involved 71 proposals from around the world, but was won by four Swiss architects: Charles Dubois, Alphonse Laverrière, Eugène Monod, and Jean Taillens (whose other design came third). The sculptures were then created by two French sculptors Paul Landowski and Henri Bouchard.

During the Reformation, Geneva was the centre of Calvinism, and its history and heritage since the sixteenth century has been closely linked to that of Protestantism. Due to the close connections to that theology, the individuals most prominently depicted on the Wall were Calvinists; nonetheless, key figures in other theologies are also included.

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Founded: 1909
Category: Statues in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Rim Zaafouri (16 months ago)
This wall was interesting to visit as it has the statues of William Farel, John Calvin, Theodore Beza and John Knox who represent the protestant reformation in Geneva. However, I thought the place where it was was even cooler to visit. The park was just so beautiful and relaxing. I loved it.
Bairwa Vishal (16 months ago)
Awesome historic place...must visit if visiting Geneva...don't forget to play big Chess Game nearby...it's great...
Tanja Alendar (17 months ago)
The International Monument to the Reformation, usually known as the Reformation Wall. Built into the old city walls of Geneva, the Reformation Wall overlooks the Parc des Bastions. ... The imposing Reformation Wall stands in the Parc des Bastions, portraying the major figures of the Reformation in the form of huge statues. The monument also includes important events and documents that changed the world as we know it today. Nice park around and can spent or rest there for hours.
left dock (18 months ago)
Great park for a walk and a history lesson. Do your homework work about the men who had a word in the world. People playing chess, children in playground, and a lovely passage under the trees for the romantic ones! Impressive the sculpture figures.
Melvin Diaz (2 years ago)
This is another must while visiting the historic center of Geneva. It takes only 7 min from St. Pierre cathedral. Also, accessible by bus. The wall is dedicsted to the four important figures of the reformation in Geneva. It is located within a park. Children friendly. If you got some time, read all the descriptions and visit the Univ. Of Geneva. Recommended!!!
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