Lavaux Vineyard Terraces

Lavaux, Switzerland

The Lavaux is a region in the canton of Vaud in Switzerland. The Lavaux consist of 830 hectares of terraced vineyards that stretch for about 30 km along the south-facing northern shores of Lake Geneva. Under cantonal law, the vineyards of the Lavaux are protected from development. Since July 2007, the Lavaux is one of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Although there is some evidence that vines were grown in the area in Roman times, the actual vine terraces can be traced back to the 11th century, when Benedictine and Cistercian monasteries controlled the area. It benefits from a temperate climate, but the southern aspect of the terraces with the reflection of the sun in the lake and the stone walls gives a mediterranean character to the region. The main wine grape variety grown here is the Chasselas.

There are many hikes possibles through the Lavaux vineyards. There is a hiking trail ('Terrasses de Lavaux'), going from Saint-Saphorin to Lutry, recommended by the Tourism Office of Switzerland.

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Founded: 11th century
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4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jorge C (9 months ago)
The walk along the UNESCO Lavaux terraced vineyards is worth of every minute you spend there. Magnificent views, stopping in the small villages and trying the local wines, taking a dip in the lake if it gets too hot…
Jorge (9 months ago)
The walk along the UNESCO Lavaux terraced vineyards is worth of every minute you spend there. Magnificent views, stopping in the small villages and trying the local wines, taking a dip in the lake if it gets too hot…
Celine G (2 years ago)
Eric Roels (4 years ago)
Very beautiful views en route to Lausanne
Sandra Sigrist (4 years ago)
Rebberg as far as the eye can see, feel-good atmosphere, nice people, good wine.
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