Valangin castle was a residence of the local lords from mid-12th century to 1566. The oldest visible remains date from the 13th century. It consists of a courtyard surrounded by a rampart and a 'donjon' (keep), which hosts the current museum.

Since 1430 the castle was altered with semicircular towers to be defended against the firearms. The castle was damaged by fire in 1747 which destroyed a whole wing. The dungeon was restored and partly rebuilt between 1769 and 1772. Today Valangin castle is a museum.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Greg Martin (4 months ago)
Nul qu'il faut payé l'entrée
El Mahiou (4 months ago)
Évidemment à côté de, par exemple, la tour Eiffel ou un gros château, le château de Valangin c'est une cabane. Mais ça m'a quand même beaucoup plu car l'extérieur est très grand et très beau
Juan Sánchez Méndez (5 months ago)
Lugar ideal para hacer senderismo o ir de excursión en familia unas horas. La visita al castillo merece la pena, aunque no sea nada espectacular, sobre todo por poder pasear por sus jardines y la muralla. El pueblo es muy pequeñito, pero tiene encanto y el trenecito es entretenido.
bebo 1 (15 months ago)
very nice place
Roberto Baldassarre (2 years ago)
Halloween
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