Delémont Castle

Delémont, Switzerland

Built as a summer residence for Prince-Bishop Jean-Conrad de Reinach, Delémont Castle was completed by architect Pierre Racine in 1721. Located in what is now the old town, it consists of a huge baroque complex standing between a courtyard and garden. Today, it is home to the town’s elementary schools.

The castle garden was restored in 2003 based on the original design of the baroque garden. It is divided into eight large squares surrounding a fountain. The first four squares bordering the water are lawned, while those on the eastern and western edges of the garden comprise large slabs made from white limestone concrete. The former orangery in the west of the garden was used as a synagogue from 1880 to 1909.

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Details

Founded: 1716-1721
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

www.upperrhinevalley.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ximena Alonso (18 months ago)
Cute school
Pérez Belén (2 years ago)
Super cool
Milena Wolff (3 years ago)
Magnificent atmosphere.
Silvana Dell'Anna (4 years ago)
What could be better than a good open-air film on a beautiful summer evening? ☆
Konrad Marfurt (4 years ago)
Nice place for a school
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