Today, the French Church in Bern is much more than just a place of prayer and refuge. It is now the oldest sacred building in the capital and attracts fans of architecture, art and culture alike.

The place of worship was built in the 13th century by the local Dominicans. From 1623 onward it served the Protestant community and was home to French church services. Later, the church became known as a safe haven for the Huguenots.

Art and architecture

Located just a stone’s throw away from the Kornhaus granary and Bern’s Lower Old Town, the French Church’s architectural and artistic elements are a monument to the past. Gothic pillars with high, narrow windows are combined with the austerity of the Reformation. The wooden ceiling panels in the central nave are complemented by meticulously painted wall murals around the triumphal arches. Art lovers can feast their eyes on the Nelkenmeister frescoes and test their eyesight searching for the two hidden Nägeli.

An ornate organ adorns the wall on the rood screen above the altar. Its unmistakable tones (the organ is one of the best in the city), along with the choral concerts and musical productions of major works, regularly flood the church’s interior with imposing, harmonious and polyphonic melodies. The French Church’s splendid acoustics ensure that concerts are truly memorable experiences.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

More Information

www.bern.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sara Montalto (2 years ago)
Love the eco
Tin Cugelj (2 years ago)
Super nice church with great concert possibilities!
Helmuth Trefftz (2 years ago)
Check the wonderful restored wall paintings.
Teresa Kuhn (3 years ago)
After a long time renovation and repairs, beautiful and peaceful place to go.
Hassan Aghasharif (3 years ago)
Beutiful Church
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