Jura Museum of Art and History

Delémont, Switzerland

Founded in 1909 by Arthur Daucourt, Musée jurassien d'art et d'histoire exhibits the history of Jura canton. It has 21 permanent exhibition rooms presenting the history of Jura, primarily in its cultural aspects, but also social, political and economic.

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Details

Founded: 1909
Category: Museums in Switzerland

More Information

www.mjah.ch

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zilioli Verena (7 months ago)
The Jura Museum of Art and History is one of the 50 best museums in Switzerland that is well worth seeing. The processing of the historically very comprehensive history of the Jura and the modern way it is presented to the visitor is instructive and exciting at the same time. WORTH SEEING
Ricardo Bastos (7 months ago)
Very pleasant atmosphere and excellent service provided by the employees, I recommend the visit
Yves Prongué (14 months ago)
Lieu de mémoire de l'histoire jurassienne...de fabuleux trésors avec une riche librairie et une exposition sur "Lionel O'Radiguet, Druide, Breton, écrivain et peintre" jusqu'au 10 janvier 2031.
Pomey Raphaël (15 months ago)
Very nice museum and great welcome. Worth the detour.
Sandro Restauri (16 months ago)
Very documented. History, culture, geography, industry. Enough to convince you, if necessary, that the Jura is not at the end of the world. Right off the bat, the museum warns you that you don't have to like everything, or read everything, and that you can stay there for 3 minutes or 3 hours. Nice welcome.
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