Grüningen castle was built before 1229. It was in early times owned by the Counts of Regensberg. From the original castle only the Palas exists. At the place of the today's church stood a chapel since at least 1396, which was extended 1610. In 1782 it was demolished and rebuilt in its early Classicist style.

For centuries, the castle has been the residence of bailiffs. They have been assigned for the administration and justice over the large area at the Zurich Oberland from Lake Zurich to the Töss Valley. The museum gives an overview of the history of Grüningen, the bailiwick and sovereignty with its castle and country town. The museum is located at the first floor of the castle building and is open from April to October.

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Founded: before 1229
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Werner Steiner (19 months ago)
Sehr schöner Ort mit schöner Umgebung und Altstadt. Super Gastronomie geeignet für Hochzeiten und andere Festivitäten. Danke
Emmi Meier (21 months ago)
Fuer eine standesamtliche Hochzeit sehr geeignet
Mariette Oberle (22 months ago)
Wunderschöner idyllischer Ort zum Verweilen und geniessen
Pascal Bosshard (22 months ago)
Das Schloss ist sehr sehenswert.
Aaron Rubinstein (2 years ago)
The castle is in a nice location and has ample space for events. Service is good.
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