Miraflores Charterhouse

Burgos, Spain

Miraflores Charterhouse is an Isabelline style Carthusian monastery built on a hill (known as Miraflores) about three kilometers of the center of Burgos.

Its origin dates back to 1442, when king John II of Castile donated a hunting lodge located outside city of Burgos, which had been erected by his father Henry III of Castile 'the Mourner' in 1401, to the Order of the Carthusians for its conversion into a monastery, thus fulfilling his father's desire, stated in his will. A fire in 1452 caused the destruction of the pavilion, and construction of a building began in 1454. It is this building, which was placed under the patronage of Saint Mary of the Annunciation, which exists today. The work was commissioned to Juan de Colonia, and was continued after his death by his son, Simón de Colonia, who completed the structure in 1484 at behest of Queen Isabella I of Castile, surviving daughter of kings John II of Castile and Isabella of Portugal, whose impressive buried are housed in the monastery.

It is a latter-Gothic jewel, and its highlights include the church, with Isabelline style's western facade decorated with the coats of its founders. The monastery consists of a single nave with stellar vault and side chapels, and is topped by a polygonal apse.

The main altarpiece of the Charterhouse was carved in wood by artist Gil de Siloé and polychrome and gilded by Diego de la Cruz (whose gold came from the first shipments of the American continent after its discovery). Made between 1496 and 1499, is undoubtedly one of the most important existing works of the Spanish Gothic sculpture, by its compositional and iconographic originality and excellent quality of carving, valued by the polychrome.

The royal sepulchers's set were designed by artist Gil de Siloé commissioned by Queen Isabella I of Castile. On the one hand is the Sepulchers of John II of Castile and Isabella of Portugal, placed in the nave's center, eight-pointed star shaped. And in the Gospel side of the church is located the Sepulcher of infante Alfonso of Castile. Both sepulchers were made in alabaster and are late-Gothic sculpture's jewels.

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Address

BU-800 5, Burgos, Spain
See all sites in Burgos

Details

Founded: 1442
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ruby Tuesday (3 years ago)
Wonderful and very beautiful collection.
Adam Goodsearles (4 years ago)
Peaceful, beautiful and will only take 1hr to go round once you’re there. Well worth the 10 min drive from the centre to visit and has artwork and an altar that rivals the cathedral.
Peter Darroch (4 years ago)
Possibly one of the most peaceful and serene laces I have ever been to.
Carl Arrowsmith (5 years ago)
It's an interesting place to visit, beautiful art work and building. Worth going if you're nearby but I wouldn't drive a great distance.
ivan zatz (5 years ago)
Great little convent a couple of miles outside of Burgos. The building is lovely, it has some nice art, a wonderful altarpiece and lavishly decorated tombs of the king and queen who were the parents of Queen Isabella. Well worth the visit.
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