St. Lawrence Cathedral

Lugano, Switzerland

The Cathedral of Saint Lawrence was founded in the High Middle Ages but rebuilt in the late 15th century, with the façade completed in 1517. It is the seat of the Diocese of Lugano, and dedicated to Saint Lawrence of Rome.

The church is known on this site from 818. In 1078 it was made a collegiata, becoming a cathedral in 1888. The original Romanesque building was oriented the opposite way to the present church, as is shown by remains of the apse discovered under the current parvise. In the 15th century the church was expanded and the entrance moved to the present position, while the open roof was covered by a groin vaulted ceiling.

There were extensive renovations in 1905-1910, when some Baroque chapels were demolished and the interior received frescoes by Ernesto Rusca.

The church's main feature is its facade, which was inspired by Giovanni Antonio Amadeo's Certosa di Pavia. It is made of white stone from Saltrio and Viggiù and of Carrara marble, and is divided in three sectors by four false columns supporting the entablature. In the middle sector is the main portal and a large rose window with decoration of cherubs executed after 1578. The decorations of the portals' frames are of high quality, with figures of puttoes, birds and lion-protomes. The central portal, called the 'Saints Portal', has five medallions with reliefs, depicting four saints and, in the middle, the Virgin with Child. Between the portal's frame and the entablature are two angels carrying torches, resembling the decoration of the Roman triumphal arches.

Between the portals, inside square frames, are busts of the Four Evangelists and of the Kings Solomon and David. The entablature frieze has 17 figures, including biblical characters and the Sibyls. Also present are animal figures, while a restoration in 2002 showed traces of a fresco. The main portal of the Romanesque church is now moved to the sacristy.

The bell tower dates, in its lower part, to the Romanesque church. The two upper storey are in the Baroque style with an octagonal lantern covered by a cupola, designed by Costante Tencalla.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ramchandra salgaonkar (19 months ago)
Must see ... Beautiful view of the city
Hrishikesh Sinkar (19 months ago)
Amazing place and a great view of Lugano city. The inside of the cathedral is beautiful, but not photos allowed so be respectful :) The art inside is exquisite.
Philippe Jacques Kradolfer (20 months ago)
The Cattedrale San Lorenzo de Lugano is a beautiful building with impactful paintings and decorations. The original construction dates back to the 15th century with many additions and remodelling work done over the years. A visit to Lugano would not be complete without visiting this impressive cathedral.
Delphine Stegmann (20 months ago)
Beautiful church with friendly church goers. Fantastic view from the terrace
Christopher Muro (2 years ago)
Very nice architecture and view from this church's square.
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