Casa Botines

León, Spain

The Casa Botines (built 1891-1892) is a Modernist building in León, designed by Antoni Gaudí. It was adapted to serve as the headquarters of Caja España, a local savings bank.

While Gaudí was finishing the construction of the Episcopal Palace of Astorga, his friend and patron, Eusebi Güell recommended that he build a house in the center of León. Simón Fernández and Mariano Andrés, the owners of a company that bought fabrics from Güell, commissioned Gaudí to build a residential building with a warehouse. The house's nickname comes from the last name of the company's former owner, Joan Homs i Botinàs.

In 1929, the savings bank of León, Caja España, bought the building and adapted it to its needs, without altering Gaudí's original project.

With the Casa Botines, Gaudí wanted to pay tribute to León's emblematic buildings. Therefore, he designed a building with a medieval air and numerous neo-Gothic characteristics. The building consists of four floors, a basement and an attic. Gaudí chose an inclined roof and placed towers in the corners to reinforce the project's neo-Gothic feel. To ventilate and illuminate the basement, he created a moat around two of the façades, a strategy that he would repeat at the Sagrada Família in Barcelona.

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Details

Founded: 1891-1892
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ruby Tuesday (2 years ago)
Wonderful work
Kimber Rischar (2 years ago)
Gaudí's work has always intrigued me. This is one of his subdued works but it's still very beautiful.
Francisco Ramos (3 years ago)
A unique piece of art. A must see in León
Julia Jane Bodington (3 years ago)
Absolutely fantastic. I've longed to see inside the building for years. The guided tour in English was excellent. Very informative. After this building you should visit the Bishop's Residence in Astorga, León. The two buildings are complimentary. And then El Capricho in Comillas, on the Cantabrian coast, whose Japanese owners are beginning to open up to visitors. It was Gaudi's first commission. These are the only Gaudí buildings outside Cataluña. And not stuffed with tourists.
Javier Miguelez (3 years ago)
Amazing outside, disappointing inside. Do not pay for this. There is not much to see inside about Gaudí.
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