Guzmanes Palace

León, Spain

The current headquarters of the the provincial government is one of the most beautiful palaces in the León. The Palacio de los Guzmanes construction took place between 1559 and 1572 in the lands where the old city wall used to stand. The construction work was never finished and the palace deteriorated until i tended up abandoned. In 1882 it was purchased by the provincial government  for its recovery, and since then, a series of reforms have taken place.

It is a place of delicate elegance from the Renaissance, with flair and structural simplicity. Inside, the extraordinary courtyard leads up the stairs to the administrative offices. At the main entrance, there are two reliefs: one represents Saint Augustine washing Pilgrim Christ’s feet. The other is the Annunciation. Likewise, there’s the sculpture of the aforementioned bishop Juan Quiñones de Guzmán, work by Valentín Yugueros. In the façade there is the mysterious Guzmanes’ coat of arms, a bucket with six snakes getting out.

The building’s base is like a trapezoid, with four towers at the corners and an indoor courtyard with columns and beautiful stained glass windows at the second level. The palace has two parts: balconies in the upper one and barred windows in the lower one. The main façade makes up a third part, which is a gallery of glazed arches between Corinthian pilasters. The building’s floors are vertically connected through a spiral staircase located at the Southeast tower.

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Address

Calle Cid 4, León, Spain
See all sites in León

Details

Founded: 1559-1572
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

More Information

turisleon.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elizabeth Starr (19 months ago)
Guided tour only in Spanish... I wish this was made clear before we bought tickets at the machine which gave information in several different languages! 5 minutes would have been enough looking around but we were locked in for an hour!
Amparo Villamandos (19 months ago)
Es un lugar digno de visitar. Me encantó la feria del libro y la animación del grupo regional Xeitu
SunsetCornet (19 months ago)
Very nice place for a quick visit The guided tour is very cheap and totally worth it, they show you the main room upstairs which is very beautiful The best thing about this tour is the lovely lady who was giving the tour when we went, she gave a lot of very cool facts and told us many things about the place, Leon, and in general anything related that you might ask her and more. Highly recommended guided visit tour
F.M. Sampedro (19 months ago)
Espectacular edificio
Juan José Fiol Ojanguren (2 years ago)
Ok
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