Astorga Cathedral

Astorga, Spain

The Cathedral of Astorga edifice was begun in 1471, within the same walls of its Romanesque predecessors from the 11th-13th centuries. The construction lasted until the 18th century, thus to its original Gothic style appearance were added elements from later styles, such as the Neo-Classicist cloister (18th century), the Baroque towers, capitals and the façade, and the Renaissance portico.

The interior houses numerous artworks, such as the Flemish-Spanish retablo of St. Michael, and the large high altar by Gaspar Becerra (1558), considered a masterwork of the Spanish Renaissance sculpture. Other sculptures include the Purísima by Gregorio Fernández (1626), St. John the Baptist and St. Jerome by Mateo del Prado (17th century) and the Christ of the Waters (14th century).

Next to the church is the Neo-medieval Episcopal Palace, designed by Antoni Gaudí.

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Founded: 1471
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

peter csicsovszki (2 years ago)
Beautiful place and lots of info is available in the free English audio guide. Worth a visit
peter csicsovszki (2 years ago)
Beautiful place and lots of info is available in the free English audio guide. Worth a visit
Roxana Burghina (3 years ago)
Impressive architecture, definitely worth a visit. The museum also has some highly valuable and beautiful pieces. Take an hour to see it!
Roxana Burghina (3 years ago)
Impressive architecture, definitely worth a visit. The museum also has some highly valuable and beautiful pieces. Take an hour to see it!
Gerard Fleming (3 years ago)
€5 to enter but we only had half an hour before it closed so not enough time. Impressive from the outside. The carvings around the main door are stunning. The attention to detail on the clothing and the women's dresses took someone a long time to do. There is no prayer chapel here. There is a church across the road that has evening prayers.
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