15th century castle in Sarmiento belonged to the important Sarmiento family. Its last owner was the House of Alba. Acquired by the Provincial Council of Palencia, we can visit the tower, its rooms and its ramparts. It hosts an exhibition entitled PlastiHistoria, showing various scenes made in clay on the history of Palencia. Its keep has a height of 22 meters and the thickness of its walls is the largest of the Spanish castles, reaching 11 meters thick in some places

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Justiniano de Campos (2 years ago)
Impecable restauracion y puesta en valor. Al lado de Palencia y barato el acceso. Recomendable si pasas por la zona
Francisco Javier (2 years ago)
Sencillo. Muy sucia la azotea de excrementos de las palomas. En la planta superior suele tener alguna exposición. Entrada quizás algo cara para lo que realmente se ve en su interior, pero aceptable si pensamos que es una contribución para mantener el patrimonio.
Juan C (2 years ago)
Bonito castillo y curiosa historia perfectamente narrada por las dos chicas que hacen la visita guiada, quienes con su expresión impregnan sensaciones y captan la emoción de hasta los más pequeños. ¡Enhorabuena chicas!
Susana Vegas (2 years ago)
Fantástica la visita guiada... mis hijos y yo misma salimos encantados... lo recomiendo a todo el mundo, merece la pena!!
mat_ bmeijer (4 years ago)
Is actually closed during the week, only open on the weekends. As such, you can olny see it from the outside
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