Museo Nacional de Escultura

Valladolid, Spain

The Museo Nacional de Escultura has an extensive collection sculptural ranging from the Middle Ages to the 19th century from Region of Castile's churchs.

The museum was founded as the Provincial Museum of Fine Arts in 1842. It had its first headquarters at the Palacio de Santa Cruz.

The museum houses works from the 13th to 19th centuries, executed mostly in the Central Spain, and also in other regions historically connected to Spain (Italy, Flanders, Southern America). Artworks include, among the others, a Raising of the Cross by Francisco del Rincon, I Thirst, and The Way of Calvary Gregorio Fernández, Adoration of the Magi by Alonso Berruguete, Lamentation of Christ by Juan de Juni, Penitent Magdalene by Pedro de Mena or the Holy Sepulchre or passage of the Sleepers Alonso de Rozas.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1842
Category: Museums in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jeff Miller (10 months ago)
OMG! This is a fabulous museum! Do not let the religious theme of these sculpture turn you away...these are some of Spain's masterpieces. Not too big but wonderfully presented and laid out with quality information. A must see in Valladolid.
ΚΩΝΣΤΑΝΤΙΝΟΣ ΑΝΤΩΝΟΠΟΥΛΟΣ (13 months ago)
This is a must visit Museum for sure of the city of Valladolid and of Spain in general. A great collection of numerous impressive mediaval and later wooden statues representing figures and tales of the christian religion. The historical building is preserved in a great condition and it is quite amazing to explore.
Iirina Iri (13 months ago)
amazing!! go vistit it, it is very impressive .. and free on Sundays
Ana Mari Marcos (15 months ago)
This place is amazing! It should be a must visit museum in Valladolid.
César Orille Museums & Gyms (16 months ago)
The museum has an extensive and well organized collection ranging from the 5th to the 19th century. The Old choir stalls of the church of San Benito de Valladolid are amazing. Very friendly staff who are willing to help with anything you need. Free admission on Sunday.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Baths of Caracalla

The Baths of Caracalla were the second largest Roman public baths, or thermae, in Rome. It was built between AD 212 and 217, during the reigns of Septimius Severus and Caracalla. They would have had to install over 2,000t of material every day for six years in order to complete it in this time. 

The baths remained in use until the 6th century when the complex was taken by the Ostrogoths during the Gothic War, at which time the hydraulic installations were destroyed. The bath was free and open to the public. The earthquake of 847 destroyed much of the building, along with many other Roman structures.

The building was heated by a hypocaust, a system of burning coal and wood underneath the ground to heat water provided by a dedicated aqueduct. It was in use up to the 19th century. The Aqua Antoniniana aqueduct, a branch of the earlier Aqua Marcia, by Caracalla was specifically built to serve the baths. It was most likely reconstructed by Garbrecht and Manderscheid to its current place.

In the 19th and early 20th century, the design of the baths was used as the inspiration for several modern structures, including St George's Hall in Liverpool and the original Pennsylvania Station in New York City. At the 1960 Summer Olympics, the venue hosted the gymnastics events.