Mombeltran Castle

Mombeltrán, Spain

There may have been earlier castles at this site, but the Mombeltran castle we see today was built by Don Beltrán de la Cueva, the first Duke of Alburquerque. He placed his coat of arms and those of his successive spouses above the entrance gate. This makes us believe that the construction of the castle took place between 1462 and 1474. The castle was donated to Don Beltrán by King Enrique IV, in 1461. Because there's architectural similarity between this castle and Belmonte Castle and Manzanares el Real Castle its architect probably has been Juan Guas. Although Mombeltrán Castle has a military and defensive appearance there are also many details of luxury for a palatial residence. Also in the 16th century the castle was modified for even more comfort.

Basically the castle is a square of rubblework and granite ashlar masonry with circular towers in the corners. The largest of those towers was the keep which has a central column in its interior on which the floors rest. Around the castle there is a second enclosure which closely follows the outlines of the inner one. This enclosure is equipped with a barbican.

Mombeltrán Castle lies on a beautiful spot, in the mountains of the Sierra de Gredos.

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Details

Founded: 1462-1474
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jaime M (14 months ago)
El pueblo, bonito y acogedor. Gente amable y el lugar maravilloso
Daniel Morala (15 months ago)
Esta muy bien conservado y en mi opinión es buena visita si se está por la zona.
Maria Fernandez De Mera De la Peñd (15 months ago)
Muy recomendable la visita. Está en un enclave perfecto para contemplar el valle y mantiene su estructura casi originalmente. El guía hace una presentación muy buena y muy completa; merece la pena hacer la visita guiada. Eso sí, hay que llamar al guía con tiempo para concertar la cita.
Angélica González (16 months ago)
Precioso e imaginarte como fue en su tiempo es una maravilla. Esta bien conservado pero poco a poco...ojala algún día pueda ser rehabilitado y lleguen algún acuerdo patrimonio y su dueño. Muy buenas vistas. El guía muy majo lo explica muy bien.
Paco J Cuesta (3 years ago)
Hidden wonder!
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