Santo Tomé el Viejo Church

Ávila, Spain

Santo Tomé el Viejo Church was built outside the walls in the mid-12th century opposite the Gate of El Peso de la Harina (which was opened up in the 16th century when the Gate of El Obispo was closed).

Built in Caleno granite, besides some of its interior elements, it conserves the 12th-century east and south entrances, with their semi-circular arches and archivolts set on columns on the west porch and on the fascia of the capitals to the south; they boast a declaration made up of figurative, plant and geometric motifs. In 1520, the apses were removed from the upper end, together with the arches that separated the naves (replaced by columns forming two large arches on each side) and the layout was reduced to one rectangular nave.

Besides its function as a church, this Romanesque building has had many uses. After the sale of church land ordered by Mendizábal, it became a private building and was used as a garage and petrol station until 1960, when it was acquired by the State. It was designated a National Monument in 1963. It is currently an annex of the Provincial Museum and is used as a storage area for stone archaeological items; it is also open to the general public.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.avilaturismo.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gilberto Fonseca (3 years ago)
Museu pequeno com peças antigas.
Pilar pilar (3 years ago)
Está bien, reutilizan la iglesia como almacén arqueológico. Hay un mosaico romano, a la entrada, muy bien conservado. Se entra con la misma entrada del museo de Ávila.
Alberto Alvarez (3 years ago)
Muy bonita merece la pena visitarla.
José Vicente Ríos (4 years ago)
Aunque es un almacen del Museo Arqueológico cuenta con algunas piezas interesantes. Entrada gratuita. Merece la pena entrar y contemplar la estructura de la iglesia y los distintos elementos expuestos.
Jaime RM (4 years ago)
Entrada gratuita. Merece la pena echar un vistazo. Curiosos los usos que se le ha dado a esta iglesia
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.