St. Teresa Church

Ávila, Spain

St. Teresa Church was built on the house in which Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada was born and is part of the Carmelite convent. Underground, the large vaulted burial crypt, which is currently used as the Museum of St Teresa, is the only example of its kind in Spanish religious architecture. The work was directed by the Carmelite architect Fray Alonso de San José and began in 1629. The building was opened on 15 October 1636.

In the purest Carmelite Baroque style, the church has a Latin-cross layout with a central nave and four chapels on each side. With the main altar in the northwest, it does not keep to established liturgical orientation as the presbytery was built to coincide with the room in which Teresa of Jesus was born. The entrance to the chapel of St Teresa opens up on the right arm of the transept and coincides with the area in which her family home once stood, together with the 'small garden where the saint prayed' opposite.

The front, which was designed in the style of an altarpiece, is separated into three bodies, giving prominence to the marble statue of the saint and the coats of arms of the Cepeda and Ahumada families, the Order of the Barefoot Carmelites, that of the Duke of Olivares, that of the Governor and that of Doctor of the Church.

Inside, the sculptures by Gregorio Fernández (17th century) and his school are of particular interest.

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Address

Plaza la Santa 3, Ávila, Spain
See all sites in Ávila

Details

Founded: 1629
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.avilaturismo.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Subhash Chandra Jose (2 months ago)
Don't forget to pray and go in to the left side of the church to see the birthplace and bedroom of st Teresa while being in the luxury of her father's wealth
STUART GIBBONS (4 months ago)
A place of peace and calm, with the bonus of historical significance.
Joseph SR (5 months ago)
GOOD. VERY SPECIAL FOR NUNS.
Bruno Pinto (11 months ago)
One of the dearest and most sacred places to me. I have been few years ago and came back now in November 2021. The first time that I was there, I was a wreck, disperse and unable to see a clear direction. The second time after mine, if I can call it, spiritual journey, I was in a much better place. Sitting there again, this time, calmer and thankful, was indeed the end of circle and a start of a new one. Santa Teresa, her thoughts and writings, truly helped me finding my inner voice. My advice to anyone that goes there is to let go, no judgements, go humble and leave your worldly being for a few moments. Be silent and alone. God be with you all.
THOMPALLY CultureFusion (12 months ago)
Wow...no wonder, must visited place in the world. Historic, spirituality and Beauty mingled to welcome to a new experience, which you never Benn in your life so blendid experience....
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