St. Teresa Church

Ávila, Spain

St. Teresa Church was built on the house in which Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada was born and is part of the Carmelite convent. Underground, the large vaulted burial crypt, which is currently used as the Museum of St Teresa, is the only example of its kind in Spanish religious architecture. The work was directed by the Carmelite architect Fray Alonso de San José and began in 1629. The building was opened on 15 October 1636.

In the purest Carmelite Baroque style, the church has a Latin-cross layout with a central nave and four chapels on each side. With the main altar in the northwest, it does not keep to established liturgical orientation as the presbytery was built to coincide with the room in which Teresa of Jesus was born. The entrance to the chapel of St Teresa opens up on the right arm of the transept and coincides with the area in which her family home once stood, together with the 'small garden where the saint prayed' opposite.

The front, which was designed in the style of an altarpiece, is separated into three bodies, giving prominence to the marble statue of the saint and the coats of arms of the Cepeda and Ahumada families, the Order of the Barefoot Carmelites, that of the Duke of Olivares, that of the Governor and that of Doctor of the Church.

Inside, the sculptures by Gregorio Fernández (17th century) and his school are of particular interest.

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Address

Plaza la Santa 3, Ávila, Spain
See all sites in Ávila

Details

Founded: 1629
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.avilaturismo.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stephen Jesenko (6 months ago)
Beautiful place! Rich history! España is wonderful.
samer arraj (7 months ago)
Important site for catholic especially for those devoted to Santa Theresa
black Joh (7 months ago)
Santa Teresa was born here so that the prayers from all over the world visit here
David Gehrig (10 months ago)
Awesome tourist stop, lots to see
Rolando Descalzo (2 years ago)
A very special place. Perhaps because I was surprised to see that my last name is found on one of the marker on one of the door near the church. First time to learn about the life of St. Teresa. You can also see the artifacts of St. Teresa's remains in one of the religious display nearby. Very contemplative atmosphere, specially when the place is not inundated with tourists. I wonder what the place feels like during winter when tourists are far between. Would like to put that in my bucket list. Someday....God willing. Overall impression, it will have more impact if you come with a religious frame of mind as opposed to party-going sightseeing mode.
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