Alcalá de Henares Cathedral

Alcalá de Henares, Spain

The Cathedral of St Justus and St Pastor in Alcalá de Henares was constructed between 1497 and 1515 in late Gothic style. The tower was built between 1528 and 1582.

During the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) the church was burned losing virtually all its treasures, saving some bars and some chairs from the old choir. In 1991 the diocese of Alcalá restored and elevated to the status of cathedral-master, the Diocese Complutense recovering that which was from the 5th century until 1099.

The exterior of the Cathedral is simple and austere. The walls are covered by molding type Segovia. They emphasize the cover of the western facade of Flamboyant Gothic style, in which central medallion depicted on Saint Ildefonso; and the tower, designed by Rodrigo Gil de Hontañón and Rodrigo Argüello, in herrerian style, with a height of 62.05 meters. Top is a beautiful spire tower slate.

The cathedral has a severe seventeenth century cloister arches between pilasters. Soils appear covered by Renaissance carpets from nearby convents. In one of the walls the grave of Cardinal Cisneros remains.

The building's interior is divided into three naves covered by cross vaults resting on pillars fasciculados. The overall shape of the building resembles the traditional Latin cross with marked transept. The entire building suffered much in that fire, and countless works of art and objects of great historical, devotional and sentimental value were lost. Today the cathedral houses apart from its religious functions, an interpretive center and the Cathedral Museum.

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Details

Founded: 1497 -1515
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Taihao Zhang (16 months ago)
Good food and it's very affordable. But kinda slow but it's ok
alan doyle (2 years ago)
The best burgers for miles around. Friendly atmosphere and staff were very attentive
Russell Harris (2 years ago)
Was originally built in 15th C, but rebuilt after fire damage in 1939. It's called a "magisterial" cathedral because its clerics were all masters, ie graduate teachers of the university. One of only two in the world! The other is San Pedro de Lovaina. Contains the Cripta de los Santos Niños a reliquary dedicated to two children (Saints Justo and Pastor) who were supposedly executed in 304 for their Christian faith under emperor Diocletian. The original temple dates back to 414.
Judit Sipkoi (2 years ago)
Rooms are noisy as near service area. Great location
Raquel Corberan (2 years ago)
Very nice for food. Good price in bedrooms. Right on the center of the city. Does not have wheelchair access or elevator because is a very old place (in a very good condition). Bed condition could be improved making the mattress more comfortable.
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