Ses Païsses

Artà, Spain

Ses Païsses is a Bronze Age talayotic settlement in northeastern Majorca. It is one of the most important and best-preserved prehistoric sites in the Balearic Islands, although it is largely overgrown with woodland, mainly Quercus ilex (holm oak), making it impossible to see the site as a whole.

The Ses Païsses settlement is thought to have begun as a cylindrical talaiot, or 'turriform', built during the first millennium BC (c. 900–800 BC) on a hillside with a commanding view of the surrounding countryside. Originally it would have stood alone, probably as a territorial marker. The tower is 12m in diameter and still stands 4m tall; there are stairs within the massively thick wall, but the building's central column has not survived. Visitors to the site are not allowed to access this building.

The talaiots are Bronze Age megalithic structures on the islands of Menorca and Majorca. There are at least 274 of them. Dating from the late second millennium and early first millennium BC (between 1,300–900 BC), they are round or square structures built of rough stone, around a central space at the center of which stood a column. This supported a ceiling of stone slabs which also formed the floor of the next story. Their purpose is not clearly understood: religious or tribal ceremonies, storehouses and distribution centres have been suggested. They are not thought to have been used as dwelling places or as defensive buildings.

These monuments pre-date the taulas, which are usually found nearby. The Talaiotic Culture began some 3,000 years ago and ended with the arrival of the Romans in the Balearic Islands in 123 BC.

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Details

Founded: 900-800 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Richard Bird (11 months ago)
For €2 and seeing a 3000 year site and no effort getting around was great. Note if you are very unsteady on your feet it would be difficult.
Bartosz Jasik (11 months ago)
Real Flinstons houses in very good condition
Michelle Gehringer (12 months ago)
Great insight into early human settlements.
sue s (2 years ago)
if you are interested in old stones, you should go there :-D its a talaiotic village (culture of the iron age) - i thought it to be very interesting.
Kairy Schürmann (3 years ago)
Free parking, restroom available next to the 2€ entrance fee station. The ruins are fantastic and the huge stones they used are unbelievable! The signs are older, but legible. Definitely wear supportive shoes. Active archaeological digging while we visited. Respect for this fantastic location is a must!
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