Naveta d'Es Tudons

Islas Baleares, Spain

The Naveta d'Es Tudons is the most remarkable megalithic chamber tomb in the Balearic island of Menorca. 

In Menorca and Majorca there are several dozen habitational and funerary naveta complexes, some of which similarly comprise two storeys. Navetas are chronologically pre-Talaiotic constructions.

The Naveta d'Es Tudons served as collective ossuary between 1200 and 750 BC. The lower chamber was for stashing the disarticulated bones of the dead after the flesh had been removed while the upper chamber was probably used for the drying of recently placed corpses. Radiocarbon dating of the bones found in the different funerary navetas in Menorca indicate a usage period between about 1130-820 BC, but the navetas like the Naveta d'Es Tudons are probably older.

The shape of the Naveta d'Es Tudons is that of a boat upside down, with the stern as its trapezoidal façade and the bow as its rounded apse. Its groundplan is an elongated semicircle. Externally, the edifice is 14.5 m long by 6.5 m wide and 4.55 m high but it would originally have been 6 m high.

The front, side walls and apse of the edifice consist of successive horizontal corbelled courses of huge rectangular or square limestone blocks dressed with a hammer and fitted together without mortar, with an all-round foundation course of blocks of even greater size laid on edge.

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Islas Baleares, Spain
See all sites in Islas Baleares

Details

Founded: 1200 - 750 BCE
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Peasey (12 months ago)
Easy access for the main road and is very intact with information about the structure took about 30mins
Ahmad Barotchi (12 months ago)
Impressive prehistoric structure, remarkable to think it was built so long ago without mortar. There's a brief info leaflet when you pay at the kiosk at the entrance to the site by the parking lot (just off the main road outside ciutadella). Apart from that there's not much signposting or other info as far as I remember. The kiosk also has some general maps and info about menorca island.
Peter Balmer (12 months ago)
Interesting. Worth a 15 minute visit if passing.
Keiran Phillips (12 months ago)
One of many prehistoric site on the island. Definitely worth a visit. It's only 400m from the main road.
Steve Irwin (16 months ago)
As far as Tudons go, this is the best one I've visited in a long time.
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