Naveta d'Es Tudons

Islas Baleares, Spain

The Naveta d'Es Tudons is the most remarkable megalithic chamber tomb in the Balearic island of Menorca. 

In Menorca and Majorca there are several dozen habitational and funerary naveta complexes, some of which similarly comprise two storeys. Navetas are chronologically pre-Talaiotic constructions.

The Naveta d'Es Tudons served as collective ossuary between 1200 and 750 BC. The lower chamber was for stashing the disarticulated bones of the dead after the flesh had been removed while the upper chamber was probably used for the drying of recently placed corpses. Radiocarbon dating of the bones found in the different funerary navetas in Menorca indicate a usage period between about 1130-820 BC, but the navetas like the Naveta d'Es Tudons are probably older.

The shape of the Naveta d'Es Tudons is that of a boat upside down, with the stern as its trapezoidal façade and the bow as its rounded apse. Its groundplan is an elongated semicircle. Externally, the edifice is 14.5 m long by 6.5 m wide and 4.55 m high but it would originally have been 6 m high.

The front, side walls and apse of the edifice consist of successive horizontal corbelled courses of huge rectangular or square limestone blocks dressed with a hammer and fitted together without mortar, with an all-round foundation course of blocks of even greater size laid on edge.

Comments

Your name



Address

Islas Baleares, Spain
See all sites in Islas Baleares

Details

Founded: 1200 - 750 BCE
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Perkolator (7 months ago)
Must see megalithic monument representative of Menorca. Well preserved.
INDY Gill (2 years ago)
Amazing I love these sites a Tue look into the past
Gregorio Blanco (2 years ago)
Very old burial site, incredible well preserved. Some stones were cut to accommodate others, 3000 years ago.
Mark Peasey (3 years ago)
Easy access for the main road and is very intact with information about the structure took about 30mins
Ahmad Barotchi (3 years ago)
Impressive prehistoric structure, remarkable to think it was built so long ago without mortar. There's a brief info leaflet when you pay at the kiosk at the entrance to the site by the parking lot (just off the main road outside ciutadella). Apart from that there's not much signposting or other info as far as I remember. The kiosk also has some general maps and info about menorca island.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal arch. The arch spans the Via triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph.

Though dedicated to Constantine, much of the decorative material incorporated earlier work from the time of the emperors Trajan (98-117), Hadrian (117-138) and Marcus Aurelius (161-180), and is thus a collage. The last of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, it is also the only one to make extensive use of spolia, reusing several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly created for the arch.

The arch is 21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. Above the archways is placed the attic, composed of brickwork reveted (faced) with marble. A staircase within the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, on the west side, facing the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Roman Forum.