Kerameikos was the potters' quarter of the city, from which the English word 'ceramic' is derived, and was also the site of an important cemetery and numerous funerary sculptures erected along the road out of the city towards Eleusis.

The earliest tombs at the Kerameikos date from the Early Bronze Age (2700-2000 BC), and the cemetery appears to have continuously expanded from the sub-Mycenaean period (1100-1000 BC). In the Geometric (1000-700 BC) and Archaic periods (700-480 BC) the number of tombs increased; they were arranged inside tumuli or marked by funerary monuments. The cemetery was used incessantly from the Hellenistic period until the Early Christian period (338 BC until approximately the sixth century AD).

The most important Athenian vases come from the tombs of the Kerameikos. Among them is the famous “Dipylon Oinochoe”, which bears the earliest inscription written in the Greek alphabet (second half of the eighth century BC). The site's small museum houses the finds from the Kerameikos excavations.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Melidoni 15, Athens, Greece
See all sites in Athens

Details

Founded: 2700 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Greece

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Santiago (3 years ago)
It is recommended to buy the combined ticket for visiting the Acropolis, which gives access to different arqueological sites including this one. The site has also a small museum, with some interesting tombstones. The archeological site gives a very nice overview of how the antique Athens looked like.
Lise Galuga (3 years ago)
A lovely cemetery in a quiet area of Athens. We enjoyed the peace and tranquility away from the large crowds on the Acropolis.
Oleksandr Garagatyi (3 years ago)
Somewhat interesting site. Was great to find there turtles. Don’t forget to go to a mini museum on site.
Anastassiya O (3 years ago)
The place is nice to visit and there cane you walk inside and outside. If it has a good weather, I think it will be nice to walk outside. There are different of things to see.
tim derrett (3 years ago)
Quiet compared to more central sites, but only 10 mins further away. Lovely setting and great history about the main ancient city gatehouse and it's relationship with acropolis. My favourite site after Parthenon itself.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Arles Amphitheatre

The two-tiered Roman amphitheatre is probably the most prominent tourist attraction in the city of Arles, which thrived in Roman times. Built in 90 AD, the amphitheatre was capable of seating over 20,000 spectators, and was built to provide entertainment in the form of chariot races and bloody hand-to-hand battles. Today, it draws large crowds for bullfighting as well as plays and concerts in summer.

The building measures 136 m in length and 109 m wide, and features 120 arches. It has an oval arena surrounded by terraces, arcades on two levels (60 in all), bleachers, a system of galleries, drainage system in many corridors of access and staircases for a quick exit from the crowd. It was obviously inspired by the Colosseum in Rome (in 72-80), being built slightly later (in 90).

With the fall of the Empire in the 5th century, the amphitheatre became a shelter for the population and was transformed into a fortress with four towers (the southern tower is not restored). The structure encircled more than 200 houses, becoming a real town, with its public square built in the centre of the arena and two chapels, one in the centre of the building, and another one at the base of the west tower.

This new residential role continued until the late 18th century, and in 1825 through the initiative of the writer Prosper Mérimée, the change to national historical monument began. In 1826, expropriation began of the houses built within the building, which ended by 1830 when the first event was organized in the arena - a race of the bulls to celebrate the taking of Algiers.

Arles Amphitheatre is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, together with other Roman buildings of the city, as part of the Arles, Roman and Romanesque Monuments group.