Fethiye Mosque

Athens, Greece

The Fethiye Mosque is located on the northern side of the ancient Roman Agora in Athens and was built on the ruins of a Christian basilica from the middle Byzantine period (8th/9th centuries). The Christian church was converted into a mosque in 1456/58, soon after the Ottoman conquest of the Duchy of Athens, to coincide with the visit to the city by Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror in 1458.

Only a fragment of the mihrab survives from this mosque, which was demolished and replaced by the present structure between 1668 and 1670. The new mosque comprises a porch and a large rectangular main hall, crowned by a dome supported by four pillars. The central dome is flanked by half-domes on each side, and by smaller domes on each corner. The porch is supported by five arches, each crowned by a small dome, resting on masonry on the sides and four pillars in the middle. During the brief occupation of the city by the Venetian forces in the Morean War (October 1687 – May 1688), the mosque was converted by the Venetians into a Catholic church, dedicated to Dionysius the Areopagite.

Following the outbreak of the Greek War of Independence, in 1824 the disused mosque was used as a school by the Filomousos Eteria of Athens. At about the same time, or shortly after the end of the war, the mosque's minaret was torn down. From 1834, after Greek independence, and until the early 20th century, it was used successively as a barracks, a military prison and finally as a military bakery, at which point additions were made to the building to house the bakery's kilns. From the early 20th century it is used mostly as a storage place for various finds from the excavations in the Agora and the Acropolis of Athens.

Except for the removal of recent additions and the restoration to its original shape in 1935, the mosque has never undergone a complete restoration, and by 2010 had developed serious structural problems. In autumn 2010, the Greek Ministry of Culture ordered the emptying of the building from the various antiquities stored there, and the beginning of the process to restore it and open it to the public. Today it is open to the public.

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Address

Pelopida 2-4, Athens, Greece
See all sites in Athens

Details

Founded: 1668-1670
Category: Religious sites in Greece

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mohammed Ikram (6 months ago)
It is not a functioning mosque from the Ottoman era. Prayers are not allowed. It is very sad. Since a mosque has been allowed for worshippers to pray from Novemer 6, 2020 in Athens , I hope the Government will also permit people to pray here too.
Bin Bin (6 months ago)
This is not a matter of religion, this is the downfall of a civilization ۔ Time has taught us how pride and arrogance have brought down the most glorious and perishable things۔ However, the mosque is a beautiful reminder of the Turkish era۔ There are some good and standard works for human beings in every age but there are many works that have saddened human history.
Ioannis Paisis (15 months ago)
"Mosque of the Conquest" is a recently renovated 17th-century (1668–1670) Ottoman mosque in ancient city of Athens. It is inside Roman Agora archaeological sight, very close to Tower of the Winds. It was built in memorial of Crete conquest on the ruins of a Christian Basilica from the middle Byzantine period. It is used for cultural exhibitions.
Ahmed Al Raeesi (2 years ago)
Truly sad not to see this mosque is functioning any more !
Ahad (2 years ago)
Beautiful mosque from the ottoman era. However as I walked inside I couldnt find any history of the mosque. There were lots of banners with info of the organisation that helped rennovate thus place. Its a shame this place is no longer used for what its meant for; praying. Entry to this place is via the Roman Forum of Athens. Tickets are €4 in winter and €8 in summer. Its a good deal in the winter. It will be a short visit because there isnt much up for viewing.
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