Fethiye Mosque

Athens, Greece

The Fethiye Mosque is located on the northern side of the ancient Roman Agora in Athens and was built on the ruins of a Christian basilica from the middle Byzantine period (8th/9th centuries). The Christian church was converted into a mosque in 1456/58, soon after the Ottoman conquest of the Duchy of Athens, to coincide with the visit to the city by Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror in 1458.

Only a fragment of the mihrab survives from this mosque, which was demolished and replaced by the present structure between 1668 and 1670. The new mosque comprises a porch and a large rectangular main hall, crowned by a dome supported by four pillars. The central dome is flanked by half-domes on each side, and by smaller domes on each corner. The porch is supported by five arches, each crowned by a small dome, resting on masonry on the sides and four pillars in the middle. During the brief occupation of the city by the Venetian forces in the Morean War (October 1687 – May 1688), the mosque was converted by the Venetians into a Catholic church, dedicated to Dionysius the Areopagite.

Following the outbreak of the Greek War of Independence, in 1824 the disused mosque was used as a school by the Filomousos Eteria of Athens. At about the same time, or shortly after the end of the war, the mosque's minaret was torn down. From 1834, after Greek independence, and until the early 20th century, it was used successively as a barracks, a military prison and finally as a military bakery, at which point additions were made to the building to house the bakery's kilns. From the early 20th century it is used mostly as a storage place for various finds from the excavations in the Agora and the Acropolis of Athens.

Except for the removal of recent additions and the restoration to its original shape in 1935, the mosque has never undergone a complete restoration, and by 2010 had developed serious structural problems. In autumn 2010, the Greek Ministry of Culture ordered the emptying of the building from the various antiquities stored there, and the beginning of the process to restore it and open it to the public. Today it is open to the public.

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Address

Pelopida 2-4, Athens, Greece
See all sites in Athens

Details

Founded: 1668-1670
Category: Religious sites in Greece

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Faruk Yazıcı (11 months ago)
A beautiful historical mosque
Jan Torfs (2 years ago)
This historical Mosque was once part of the Roman Agora site but nowadays it doesn't serve anymore as a place for praying. One can visit and notice that it is well preserved and keeps an exhibition on the life of emperor Hadrian. Since it was built it was used for different purposes and it's only recently that it was transformed into a museum. Worth while to visit and watch the nice floor and the special construction of the roof. When I passend by , unfortunately it was closed.
Taridi Kasbi Ridho (2 years ago)
It is sad that this historical mosque is not functioned as place for prayer any more. Hope some day, government will be willing to return this to original function as prayer building.
Vincent Oliver (2 years ago)
An interesting exhibition about the life and accomplishments of emperor Hadian. The building is well preserved.
Gianluca Circati (2 years ago)
Very nice and well-kept. Worth seeing the statues/fragments inside
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