Gottlieben village is first mentioned around the end of the 10th Century as Gotiliubon. It was originally part of the land owned by the Bishop of Constance. In 1251, Eberhard von Waldburg built a castle that served as the residence of the Bishops. After the Swabian War in 1499 the episcopal chief constable managed the village and the local low court from the castle until 1798. The court included Engwilen, Siegershausen and Tägerwilen as well as Gottlieben and made up the Bishop's bailiwick of Gottlieben. In 1808 the castle became private property. In 1837 it was renovated in a neo-gothic style.

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Founded: 1251
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Lidija Lida (2 years ago)
Sehr schöne ruhige Ort... ♥ ♥ ♥
Vincent Borghi (2 years ago)
La guide (en anglais) a commencé par nous parler longuement dans une salle avec beaucoup d'écho, et comme elle ne parlait pas fort, ce n'était pas tresy audible. La suite de la visite était un peu plus audible car sans écho, par contre la guide ne parlait pas assez fort, ce qui est un problème quand on est guide d'un groupe!!! Sinon, le château est très pittoresque, et est incontournable quand on est touriste à Heidelberg
MariaRios.Wittenbach@hotmail.com Rios (2 years ago)
Sehr schönes Kaffe, und die Hüppen sio fein
Vova Galinskiy (2 years ago)
вход в замок закрыт, может что воскресенье, а может частная собственность. Сфотографировать не получится.
Jacek Mogila-Stankiewicz (3 years ago)
Piękne miejsce
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