Mirasole Abbey

Milan, Italy

Mirasole Abbey was founded as a monastery of the Humiliati in the first half of the 13th century. Its economy was based on the working of wool and the production of woollen cloth.

The Humiliati were abolished in 1571, and the abbey became the property of the Collegio Elvetico in Milan, which was taken over for the use of the Austrian administration in 1786 (the building is now the Palazzo del Senato); its spiritual life was administered by the Olivetans. In 1797, the former abbey was given to the Ospedale Maggiore of Milan.

In 2013 a community of Premonstratensian canons moved into the former abbey premises as the Priorato San Norberto, a priory of Mondaye Abbey in France.

The rectangular layout includes a church and cloisters. The buildings were once surrounded by a moat, towers and a drawbridge. One entrance led towards the country, the other into the city. The church, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, was constructed in the 14th and 15th centuries. It contains a fresco of the Assumption of the Virgin by an anonymous master of 1460, linked to the school of Michelino da Besozzo.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Corrado Viganò (2 years ago)
Forse siamo stati fortunati, ma ieri, 25 aprile 19, non c'era nessuno. Il complesso è interessante con una sala che raccoglie tutte le informazioni storiche sull'abbazia, Non è un ambiente ricchissimo di opere e struttura, ma, abbinato alle abbazie limitrofe, vale un passaggio. Impagabile la tranquillità.
Angelo Begni (2 years ago)
Antica location religiosa nel parco sud Milano, sede di un'Associazione di aiuto Arca. Location di eventi di astrofili con Associazione annessa, molti eventi organizzati per la visione e incontri con personaggi importanti. Si organizzano eventi privati su ordinazione per qualsiasi portata, disponibile cucina con chef. Riunioni di preghiera o Messe celebrate. Da visitare
vanda sacchi (2 years ago)
Bellissima abbazia ristrutturata e con una piacevole zona verde. Ultimamente, grazie anche a contributi di privati, ospita famiglie in difficoltà e c è la possibilità di organizzare eventi e feste. Molto bella la chiesetta al suo interno dove ritrovare se stessi.
way fairer (3 years ago)
Splendid, worth the visit. There's a church with frescoes, a beautiful though simple cloister and green lawn.
Purple Pain (3 years ago)
Very good for weekend picnics
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