Astino Abbey was founded around 1070 by a group of members of the Vallumbrosan Order led by John Gualbert during a time in which, through reforms, clerics were trying to revive the Catholic Church's position.

The Romanesque church and the first conventual buildings were built by Bertario, the first abbot, who supervised the abbey for 21 years until 1128.

The monastery was suppressed on 4 July 1797 by the ciil aurhorities of Bergamo. Its assets were given to the nearby hospital, founded and previously run by the monks.

In 1832 the site was put to use as a psychiatric hospital, which it remained until 1892. It was then used for agricultural purposes, and was sold to private buyers in 1923.

In 1973 the property was acquired by a private company for conversion into a golfing centre, but the plan ran into so much opposition that it never came to fruition, and the monastery buildings have been left neglected until 2015.

The Church of Santo Sepulchro was consecrated in 1117, but has been rebuilt over the centuries. The base of the bell-tower dates to the 12th-century, but now has a baroque superstructure atop. The building includes a cloister of the 15th century and a chapel to the memory of Blessed Guallo de Roniis, exiled bishop of Brescia.

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Founded: 1070
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

cristian corvaglia (2 years ago)
A beautiful place near to bergamo
way fairer (3 years ago)
Simply wonderful. It matches totally my taste. It's a must if you want to see also a church with very very interesting frescoes inside.
Fabrice WATREMET (3 years ago)
Very nice place to visit as well as surroundings
Alberto Gregorio (3 years ago)
As with the neighbouring monastery, well worth a visit. Mind the opening times though
Jan Vyhlídal (3 years ago)
Awesome monastery complex in the middle of beautiful land and wineyards. 40 minutes walk from old city of Bergamo. Opened only saturdays and sundays.
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