Matris Domini Monastery

Bergamo, Italy

The Matris Domini Monastery was an enclosed female monastery. It houses a museum featuring several medieval frescoes with religious themes. The monastery was founded during the second half of the 13th century by the Dominican Order to house a community of nuns. There is no certain date for the foundation, probably during the rule of Bishop Algiso da Rosate or that of Erbordo Ungano. Its church was consecrated on 25 March 1273 by Bishop Guiscardo Suardi.

From its beginning the monastery experienced the continuous development and growth of its community. It was rebuilt in 1359 and was enlarged in the 16th- and 17th-centuries, but it was suppressed during the occupation of Italy by French forces during the Napoleonic Wars.

In modern times, it was converted into a Gestapo prison during the German occupation of Italy during World War II. The monastery was eventually returned to its own original function and to the nuns.

The museum

The monastery displays in Romanesque frescoes. Dating from the 13th and the 14th century, they are among the earliest examples of the fresco painting art in Lombardy, some of them are among the most ancient altogether.

Together with the Visitation, other frescoes are displayed, some of them well preserved. Scenes include the Just, the Blessed, two Angels with a trumpet, Saint Peter on the throne, the Hell, all attributed to the Master of the Life Tree.

The museum also houses five polychrome glass circles are displayed, originating from the 14th century stained glass window which decorated the apse of the old church. They are the oldest vitreous work in Lombardy.

The largest displays the Virgin and Blessing Child and shares with the two circles depicting the angels the peculiarity of the face and the hands devoid of color. The other two circles show, respectively, Saint Dominic Blessing and Peter of Verona, the first Dominican saint.

The church

Next to the museum, also part of the convent complex, is the church, consecrated in 1273 and composed, following the female monasteries tradition, by an internal chapel constituted by a nave and two aisles, and by the external church.

The latter was radically transformed in the 17th century into a luminous Baroque environment, decorated by stuccoes and frescoes, including some by Pietro Baschenis, as well as several altarpieces situated in the side chapels.

Above the main altar is the 17th-century altarpiece of the Annunciation, executed by an unknown master; at its sides there are the altarpiece of the Adoration of the Shepherds (also by an unknown artist) and the Massacre of the Innocents by Pietro Ricchi.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

enrico corna (17 months ago)
Very ancient cloistered monastery with a church decorated in Baroque style and a small museum that contains interesting fragments of frescoes from the 13th-14th century church, among the oldest in Bergamo
enrico corna (17 months ago)
Very ancient cloistered monastery with a church decorated in Baroque style and a small museum that contains interesting fragments of frescoes from the 13th-14th century church, among the oldest in Bergamo
rosalia simeone (19 months ago)
Both religious and secular group reunions are held. The facility is wonderful. I wanted to see the "rotary cradle" for children abandoned for once in my life. We took care of the dinner, it is equipped for these events for about 50/60 or more.
rosalia simeone (19 months ago)
Both religious and secular group reunions are held. The facility is wonderful. I wanted to see the "rotary cradle" for children abandoned for once in my life. We took care of the dinner, it is equipped for these events for about 50/60 or more.
Alessandro Buffelli (21 months ago)
Very welcoming monastery, even if only for an interview with one of the nuns. Worthy of note, in addition to the very rich Baroque church, is the exhibition set up with all the recovered and restored frescoes.
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