Mantua Cathedral

Mantua, Italy

Mantua Cathedral (Duomo di Mantova) is the seat of the Bishop of Mantua. An initial structure probably existed on the site in the Early Christian era, which was followed by a building destroyed by a fire in 894. The current church was rebuilt in 1395–1401 with the addition of side chapels and a Gothic west front, which can still be seen in a sketch by Domenico Morone (preserved in the Palazzo Ducale of Mantua). The bell tower has seven bells.

After another fire in the 16th century, Giulio Romano rebuilt the interior but saved the frontage, which was replaced however in 1756–61 by the current Baroque one in Carrara marble. Notable characteristics of the Renaissance structure are the cusps, decorated with rose windows on the south side, which end at the Gothic bell tower.

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Founded: 1395-1401
Category: Religious sites in Italy

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

eranga perera (14 months ago)
Very different amazing architectural cathedral.How lovely to visit this great cathedral.mantua had Fascinating medieval and unique historical buildings.lovely place to visit with children and family.also best with the groups.we(our group)also enjoyed very very long hour lovely wonderful amazing boat ride.it is the wonderful boat ride I ever had in my life.only problem we had (on this day 05/05/2019) is the bad weather.heavy rains and bad light effected to our tour.
Indrani Ghose (15 months ago)
Facade of Cathedral of St Pietro is mono color, huge and grand in appearance. Angelic forms in the pillars and arches are in good condition. This twelfth century creation was touched up and re-touched up in sixteenth and eighteenth century.
Miha Zakotnik (2 years ago)
Very different styles then other Christian churches has 2 side chapels directly attached to main church body. In one of the side rooms you can also find Gonzaga painting, at the time of the visit the side room holding Gonzaga was closed.
Catalina Oana Tudor (2 years ago)
Must see when in Mantova. Absolutely amazing cathedral.
Hanne V (2 years ago)
This is quite a funny buildin; the front, side and tower seem like totally different styles and actually don't go together at all, which makes it quite unique and quirky. Unfortunately didn't get to see the inside.
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