Altrathen Castle

Rathen, Germany

Unlike the neighbouring Neurathen Castle very little is known about the history of Altrathen Castle. It was probably built at the same time in the 11th century. The castle was first mentioned in the records in 1289. In 1469 Altrathen and Neurathen castles were slighted.

In 1888 the industrialist, Eduard Seifert, bought the ruins of the castle and rebuilt it in 1893 in a Neogothic style. Of the medieval castle only the cellars and parts of the spiral staircase of the keep have survived.

Aftern 1945 the building acted as a holiday home and later for the East German state bank. In 1995 the site was sold by the Treuhandanstalt to a private owner. Since then the building has been used as a small hotel and restaurant.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cindy R. (3 years ago)
Die Burg ist leider geschlossen. Es wurde privat verkauft. Der steile Anstieg war somit umsonst erfolgt.
Heinz Kordy (3 years ago)
Sehr schöne Anlage. Hier kann man gut einkehren. Das Essen und die Getränke sind zwar nicht gerade preiswert. Dafür kann man aber den schönen Blick und das Ambiente geniessen. Von hier aus gibt es einen schönen Wanderweg zur Bastei. Unterhalb an der Elbe ist ein Anlegesteg. Von hier aus kann man mit dem Raddampfer nach Dresden fahren.
Yvonne Girbig (3 years ago)
Wir besuchten kürzlich die Burg zum Abendessen das Ambiente ist wirklich sehr schön. Nur leider kann das Personal nicht Grüßen wenn man das Restaurant betritt und leider war die Auswahl der Speisen nicht gerade groß, das kann natürlich auch daran liegen das es außerhalb der Saison ist.
Leu Morani (4 years ago)
Sehr gutes Restaurant mit sehr freundlichem Personal. Das Essen war wirklich lecker und preislich mehr als angemessen. Die Auswahl ist nicht riesig, muss sie aber ja aber auch nicht sein. Die Einrichtung und die Aufmachung sind gemütlich/rustikal und für eine Burg sehr treffend. Man sollte aber definitiv reservieren.
Rachael McEwan (5 years ago)
Super!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Abbey of Saint-Étienne

The Abbey of Saint-Etienne, also known as Abbaye aux Hommes ('Men"s Abbey'), is a former monastery dedicated to Saint Stephen (Saint Étienne). It is considered, along with the neighbouring Abbaye aux Dames ('Ladies" Abbey'), to be one of the most notable Romanesque buildings in Normandy. Like all the major abbeys in Normandy, it was Benedictine.

Lanfranc, before being an Archbishop of Canterbury, was abbot of Saint-Etienne. Built in Caen stone during the 11th century, the two semi-completed churches stood for many decades in competition. An important feature added to both churches in about 1120 was the ribbed vault, used for the first time in France. The two abbey churches are considered forerunners of the Gothic architecture. The original Romanesque apse was replaced in 1166 by an early Gothic chevet, complete with rosette windows and flying buttresses. Nine towers and spires were added in the 13th century. The interior vaulting shows a similar progression, beginning with early sexpartite vaulting (using circular ribs) in the nave and progressing to quadipartite vaults (using pointed ribs) in the sanctuary.

The two monasteries were finally donated by William the Conqueror and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, as penalty for their marriage against the Pope"s ruling. William was buried here; Matilda was buried in the Abbaye aux Dames. Unfortunately William"s original tombstone of black marble, the same kind as Matilda"s in the Abbaye aux Dames, was destroyed by the Calvinist iconoclasts in the 16th century and his bones scattered.

As a consequence of the Wars of Religion, the high lantern tower in the middle of the church collapsed and was never rebuilt. The Benedictine abbey was suppressed during the French Revolution and the abbey church became a parish church. From 1804 to 1961, the abbey buildings accommodated a prestigious high school, the Lycée Malherbe. During the Normandy Landings in 1944, inhabitants of Caen found refuge in the church; on the rooftop there was a red cross, made with blood on a sheet, to show that it was a hospital (to avoid bombings).