Ravello Cathedral

Ravello, Italy

Built in the 11th century with support from the Rufolo family, the Duomo is a combination of Baroque and Romanesque styles. Dedicated to St. Pantaleone, the church has undergone extensive modifications and restorations over the past 900 years. The Duomo’s shining white façade dates back to the last major restoration in 1931. The Duomo’s bell tower, which dates back to the 13th century, shows Moorish and Byzantine influence.

Presided over by a bishop, the Duomo enjoyed a high status throughout much of its history. Today, the Duomo is primarily remembered for five attractions. The first is the bronze door, which was temporarily removed for restoration in 2010. Constructed in 1179 by Barisano da Trani, the door is of special interest because fewer than two dozen bronze church doors are still extant in Italy, three of them by Trani. The second item of special note is the pulpit, which is supported by six spiraled columns sitting atop marble lions. Across from the pulpit, to the left, is the Ambo of the Epistles that boasts two wonderful mosaics of Jonah and the whale.

The fourth area of special interest is the Chapel of St. Pantaleone the Healer, a 3rd century physician who was beheaded,on orders of the Emperor Diocletian, after he converted to Christianity. The Chapel has a small ampoule of the saint’s blood, which is said to liquefy every year on July 27th, the anniversary of his martyrdom. The chapel also has a silver bustof the town’s venerated saint. The final attraction is the cathedral’s museum, which is accessible through a side entrance on the Via Richard Wagner. While the museum’s collection is relatively small, it contains several significant sculptures and other works of art, most notably the famous marble bust believed by many to be Sigilgaita Rufolo, the wife of Nicola Rufolo, the 13th-century merchant who commissioned the cathedral’s pulpit. Other sources say the bust represents the Madonna or, alternatively, Joanna, the Queen of Naples.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

www.ravello.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

khanh phan (30 days ago)
Beautiful church with a nice square.
SeFok Chan (14 months ago)
I really enjoyed this church. It is not overly decorated and is in fact quite austere. There are two beautiful pulpits covered with mosaics with Arabic influence. The bronze church door is also spectacular. The museum of the church has some beautiful objects.
Chris Nash (2 years ago)
Although popular this place maintains it's original character. Definitely worth visiting.
RANA KHAN (3 years ago)
Lovely place.
Mary H (3 years ago)
It's unique. One of most beautiful places I've ever seen.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Varberg Fortress

Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

It is currently used as a museum and bed and breakfast as well as private accommodation. The moat of the fortress is said to be inhabited by a small lake monster. In August 2006, a couple of witnesses claimed to have seen the monster emerge from the dark water and devour a duck. The creature is described as brown, hairless and with a 40 cm long tail.