Carrickfergus castle was built by John de Courcy in 1177 as his headquarters, after he conquered eastern Ulster in 1177 and ruled as a petty king until 1204, when he was ousted by another Norman adventurer, Hugh de Lacy. Initially de Courcy built the inner ward, a small bailey at the end of the promontory with a high polygonal curtain wall and east gate. It had several buildings, including the great hall. From its strategic position on a rocky promontory, originally almost surrounded by sea, the castle commanded Carrickfergus Bay, and the land approaches into the walled town that developed beneath its shadows.

English rule in Middle Ages

The castle appears first in the official English records in 1210 when King John laid siege to it and took control of what was then Ulster's premier strategic garrison. Following its capture, constables were appointed to command the castle and the surrounding area. In 1217 the new constable, De Serlane, was assigned one hundred pounds to build a new curtain wall. The middle-ward curtain wall was later reduced to ground level in the eighteenth century, save along the seaward side, where it survives with a postern gate and the east tower, notable for a fine array of cross-bow loops at basement level.

A chamber on the first floor of the east tower is believed to have been the castle's chapel on account of its fine Romanesque-style double window surround, though the original chapel must have been in the inner ward.

After the collapse of the Earldom of Ulster in 1333, the castle remained the Crown's principal residential and administrative centre in the north of Ireland. During the early stages of the Nine Years War (1595–1603), when English influence in the north became tenuous, crown forces were supplied and maintained through the town's port. And in 1597, the surrounding country was the scene for the Battle of Carrickfergus.

Modern history

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries improvements were made to accommodate artillery, including externally splayed gunports and embrasures for cannon, though these improvements did not prevent the castle from being attacked and captured on many occasions during this time. Marshal Schomberg besieged and took the castle in the week-long Siege of Carrickfergus in 1689.

In 1760, after fierce fighting in the town, it was surrendered to French invaders under the command of Francois Thurot. They looted the castle and town and then left, only to be caught by the Royal Navy.

In 1778, a small but significant event in the American War of Independence began at Carrickfergus, when John Paul Jones, in the face of reluctance by his crew to approach too close to the Castle, lured a Royal Navy vessel from its moorings into the North Channel, and won an hour-long battle. In 1797 the Castle, which had on various occasions been used to house prisoners of war, became a prison and it was heavily defended during the Napoleonic Wars; six guns on the east battery remain of the twenty-two that were used in 1811.

For a century it remained a magazine and armoury. During the First World War it was used as a garrison and ordnance store and during the Second World War as an air raid shelter.

It was garrisoned continuously for about 750 years until 1928, when its ownership was transferred from the British Army to the new Government of Northern Ireland for preservation as an ancient monument. Many of its post-Norman and Victorian additions were then removed to restore the castle's original Norman appearance. It remains open to the public. The banqueting hall has been fully restored and there are many exhibits to show what life was like in medieval times. It was built and re-built three times, and still stands today.

On the day of his wedding, 29 April 2011, Prince William of Wales was created Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Strathearn, and Baron Carrickfergus. The latter title of peerage, along with the geographical barony itself, had been extinct since Victorian times. The title is now only ceremonial with no official connection to the castle.

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Details

Founded: 1177
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andrew Wilson (11 months ago)
Nice cellar restaurant. The day we went, several of their staff were out sick, so service was not stellar. They did their best under trying circumstances and the food was excellent. I would definitely eat here again. The ground are beautiful.
Brian U (11 months ago)
Nice castle near the sea. Easy access to car parking. Some rooms have been set up to show their pass use. There is a small gift and cafe shop. The main tower is unable to be accessed till later this year as they fix the roof so you won't see everything. Nice array of old cannons on site. Worth a visit if passing.
Jake Turnage (12 months ago)
It was very cool. I am sad that a whole section of the fortress and one tower were closed off for renovation. Nevertheless, it was still a great experience for anyone who loves old castles and forts.
David Cummins (12 months ago)
Oh this was so cool, and to think how old it is. The stories it tells, and the history is just incredible. We had a beautiful sunny day here. If you like castles this is for you. If you're in the north of Ireland this is a must see. Plus Carrickfergus is a great town on top of it all. Check out some pictures we took here.
Ravi Lakhan (13 months ago)
This was our first stop on the tour to Giant's Causeway. It was a fantastic place it was around 9 am in Morning and sun was rising so we got fabulous pics there. Castle not too big but nicely located. There are many old boats and new boats around that these make place even more beautiful. Also you can find many shops around it, Sainsbury's is also there. Nice place !!
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