The Grand Opera House is a theatre in Belfast, Northern Ireland, designed by the most prolific theatre architect of the period, Frank Matcham. It opened on 23 December 1895. Variety programmes dominated in the 1920s and 1930s and the theatre saw performances by Gracie Fields, Will Fyffe and Harry Lauder. It became a repertory theatre during World War II and at the celebrations to mark the end of the war, Eisenhower, Montgomery and Alanbrooke attended gala performances at the theatre. The Grand Opera House was acquired by the Rank Organisation, which led to its use as a cinema between 1961 and 1972.

As business slowed in the early 1970s with the onset of the Troubles (conflict in Northern Ireland during the late 20th century). The building has been damaged by bombs on several occasions, usually when the nearby Europa Hotel had been targeted. It was badly damaged by bomb blasts in 1991 and 1993. The theatre continued, however, to host musicals, plays, pantomimes and live music.

In 1995 the running of the theatre was taken over by the Grand Opera House Trust. An renovation was undertaken in 2006 with the addition of the Baby Grand performance space together with extended foyers, extended stage wings and artist accommodation and access for customers with disabilities.

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    Founded: 1895
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    4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Fernanda Soares (2 months ago)
    One of the most beautiful places I’ve been in Belfast! So beautiful
    Pamela (9 months ago)
    Love the detail in this building both inside and out. We where up to see the pantomime, which didn't disappoint. The toilets where really clean, as was the building itself. There is a small snack shop on site, that you can grab stuff during the shows.
    Caoimhin 74 (9 months ago)
    I was lucky enough to win tickets to a show in the GOH last year (2019) and this was the first time I attended a performance there. I loved the theatre, the show and had a lovely time. I was glad to hear it was getting a bit of a refurb though, as it is a little dated. Look forward to returning to see something else when it reopens.
    Ian Humphreys (10 months ago)
    Always a great experience here with beautiful surrounds and friendly helpful staff. And the panto had tears running down my eyes. So funny, so good. Sad to see it close now but I know it will be better again when it reopens in Nov 2020... for the next panto.
    Helen Keenan (15 months ago)
    I emailed a query I had regarding a gift voucher late one night last week. Helen promptly telephoned me first thing the following morning. She was very pleasant and helpful and arranged for a new gift voucher to be sent to me. So I was very impressed with their customer service. Thank you Helen!
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