The site now occupied by Belfast City Hall was once the home of the White Linen Hall, an important international Linen Exchange. Plans for the City Hall began in 1888 when Belfast was awarded city status by Queen Victoria. This was in recognition of Belfast's rapid expansion and thriving linen, rope-making, shipbuilding and engineering industries.

Construction began in 1898 under the supervision of architect Sir Alfred Brumwell Thomas and was completed in 1906. Belfast Corporation, now the council, its their profits from the gas industry to pay for the construction of the Belfast City Hall.

The exterior is built mainly from Portland stone and is in the Baroque Revival style. It covers an area of one and a half acres and has an enclosed courtyard. Featuring towers at each of the four corners, with a lantern-crowned 53 m copper dome in the centre, the City Hall dominates the city centre skyline. As with other Victorian buildings in the city centre, the City Hall's copper-coated domes are a distinctive green.

The Titanic Memorial in Belfast is located on the grounds of Belfast City Hall.

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Address

A1, Belfast, United Kingdom
See all sites in Belfast

Details

Founded: 1898
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amanda Kennedy (5 months ago)
City Hall is brilliant. I visited Belfast City Hall during my trip to Belfast this year. I wasn’t able to visit previously because of closure during Covid on a previous trip I made. The wait was worth it as I was amazed by the stunning architecture and design of this building. There was a exhibit put on when I visited about the history of building, the people of Belfast, and the vision of the town. The entire exhibit was a delightful experience learning. There is a cafe inside of city hall that supports people with autism. The food was delicious that I ordered from the cafe. I had the tomato soup and bread with butter. The building is kept up with and the grounds is well maintained. The employees of Belfast City Hall were all knowledgeable and helpful in my experience.
Anoob Madhu Lathika (5 months ago)
Belfast City Hall is the civic building of Belfast City Council located in Donegall Square, Belfast, Northern Ireland. It faces North and effectively divides the commercial and business areas of the city centre. It is a Grade A listed building. One of Belfast's most iconic buildings, Belfast City Hall first opened its doors in August 1906 and is Belfast's civic building.
Mark Edmunds (9 months ago)
A must visit, Belfast City Hall Markets. There is something for everyone, the food is fresh, appetizing and reasonabley price, honestly the food was amazing.. Very, very family friendly, very interesting. Thoroughly enjoyable experience for all ages.. Restrooms are close by..
chance mcdonald (12 months ago)
Really clean place. Its probably the most clean place In the whole city and to go through the exhibit its free! And the cafe at the end is nice. Very cool place
Mark Beattie (16 months ago)
If only the walls could speak, the tales they could tell, both for inside and outside. Get some details out of the way, built by 1906 in a baroque style. Intended to be a landmark that would live long in the memory. Outside, stylish but modest in size, whilst internally, a decor of sheer beauty, a flowing staircase with various marble structures, stained glass windows and a coat of arms for Belfast. Even though it suffered many destructive moments, including the Blitz, it still stands proudly, with gardens and seating areas commendably maintained. With a cenotaph obliging both communities, it stands proudly and is a full representation of the modest but stylish attitude of the friendly warm people from Belfast. "Modesty is the gentle art of enhancing your charm by pretending not to be aware of it."
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