The site now occupied by Belfast City Hall was once the home of the White Linen Hall, an important international Linen Exchange. Plans for the City Hall began in 1888 when Belfast was awarded city status by Queen Victoria. This was in recognition of Belfast's rapid expansion and thriving linen, rope-making, shipbuilding and engineering industries.

Construction began in 1898 under the supervision of architect Sir Alfred Brumwell Thomas and was completed in 1906. Belfast Corporation, now the council, its their profits from the gas industry to pay for the construction of the Belfast City Hall.

The exterior is built mainly from Portland stone and is in the Baroque Revival style. It covers an area of one and a half acres and has an enclosed courtyard. Featuring towers at each of the four corners, with a lantern-crowned 53 m copper dome in the centre, the City Hall dominates the city centre skyline. As with other Victorian buildings in the city centre, the City Hall's copper-coated domes are a distinctive green.

The Titanic Memorial in Belfast is located on the grounds of Belfast City Hall.

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A1, Belfast, United Kingdom
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Details

Founded: 1898
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Beattie (2 months ago)
If only the walls could speak, the tales they could tell, both for inside and outside. Get some details out of the way, built by 1906 in a baroque style. Intended to be a landmark that would live long in the memory. Outside, stylish but modest in size, whilst internally, a decor of sheer beauty, a flowing staircase with various marble structures, stained glass windows and a coat of arms for Belfast. Even though it suffered many destructive moments, including the Blitz, it still stands proudly, with gardens and seating areas commendably maintained. With a cenotaph obliging both communities, it stands proudly and is a full representation of the modest but stylish attitude of the friendly warm people from Belfast. "Modesty is the gentle art of enhancing your charm by pretending not to be aware of it."..
diane C (2 months ago)
Very impressive with beautiful marbles, structure, picture and painting etc! Must go with their house tour guide. Mr Michael is so knowledgeable and he has bring life to the history! He has make my visit very interesting!
patarida kiatsamuttara (2 months ago)
The exhibition part is amazing!!! Best museum in Belfast. If you don't have much time in Belfast. Just do this one. I visited war museum and Republic Irish museum, they are incomparable. This one is phenomenon. Totally unexpected to be seen in City Hall. Do not miss ot
MeMe B (3 months ago)
Amazing, super helpful, really knowledgeable friendly people... Anything you want to know about Belfast this is the place to go. Such a BEAUTIFUL building set in absolutely stunning garden, full of interesting things. The Hall itself has male and female public restrooms/toilets, and also facilitates for the disabled. Definitely worth a visit if you're in Belfast.
Dan Rogers (5 months ago)
An impressive building, steeped in history. Visitors are free to wander inside and meander through a number of rooms containing various artefacts relating to Belfast's history. A worthwhile use of around an hours time if you needed an overview of the city. Centrally located, near to bars and restaurants, the building is also eye-catching at night when lit up.
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