The site now occupied by Belfast City Hall was once the home of the White Linen Hall, an important international Linen Exchange. Plans for the City Hall began in 1888 when Belfast was awarded city status by Queen Victoria. This was in recognition of Belfast's rapid expansion and thriving linen, rope-making, shipbuilding and engineering industries.

Construction began in 1898 under the supervision of architect Sir Alfred Brumwell Thomas and was completed in 1906. Belfast Corporation, now the council, its their profits from the gas industry to pay for the construction of the Belfast City Hall.

The exterior is built mainly from Portland stone and is in the Baroque Revival style. It covers an area of one and a half acres and has an enclosed courtyard. Featuring towers at each of the four corners, with a lantern-crowned 53 m copper dome in the centre, the City Hall dominates the city centre skyline. As with other Victorian buildings in the city centre, the City Hall's copper-coated domes are a distinctive green.

The Titanic Memorial in Belfast is located on the grounds of Belfast City Hall.

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Address

A1, Belfast, United Kingdom
See all sites in Belfast

Details

Founded: 1898
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Safwan Ahmed (8 months ago)
Beautiful place..and has a nice open space to sit and enjoy with friends. Hosts the Christmas market every year which special ?
Prabir Kulabhusan (9 months ago)
Beautiful place in Belfast! You can enjoy here. Most of the shopping malls and restaurants are here . No doubt, almost everything you will get here.
Sri Rejeki (11 months ago)
Nice place to have a walk around here. Very safe, clean, and calm. I spent hours walking alone around touristic area in Belfast. Safe and comfortable for tourist.
Majella Browne (15 months ago)
Beautiful, unfortunately it was closed, however the garden well used with lots of people relaxing and enjoying the sunshine.
brendan rogan (15 months ago)
Nice relaxing spot among the hustle and bustle
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