Albert Memorial Clock

Belfast, United Kingdom

The Albert Memorial Clock was completed in 1869 and is one of the best known landmarks of Belfast. It was built as a memorial to Queen Victoria's late Prince Consort, Prince Albert. The sandstone memorial was constructed between 1865 and 1869 by Fitzpatrick Brothers builders and stands 113 feet tall in a mix of French and Italian Gothic styles. The base of the tower features flying buttresses with heraldic lions. A statue of the Prince in the robes of a Knight of the Garter stands on the western side of the tower. A two tonne bell is housed in the tower and the clock was made by Francis Moore of High Street, Belfast.

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Details

Founded: 1865
Category: Statues in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael Bas (17 months ago)
Its like a small big ben. Or maybe the cute version of it.
Tom Do (18 months ago)
The Clock is a historical landmark, located in a square. If you look at photos of Belfast during the industrial period, you'll see a lot of photos of this clock, which is awesome! The Clock is within walking distance from Titanic museum. Besides, it was located at one end of the square, and very close to the Big Fish, the Salmon of Knowledge, which was another awesome landmark.
sean doherty (19 months ago)
Impressive Victorian commemoration of Queen Victoria's husband, Albert after his death built by donation from the citizens of Belfast.
Jo Don (20 months ago)
The Albert Memorial Clock is a clock tower situated at Queen's Square in Belfast. It was completed in 1869 and is one of the best known landmarks of Belfast. It is sometimes described as Belfast’s answer to Pisa’s leaning tower, its tilt caused by the fact it is constructed on reclaimed land from the River Farset and weighs over 2,000 tonnes. Erected between 1865 and 1869 in Gothic style to commemorate Queen Victoria’s consort, Prince Albert, it was tall enough at 141ft (43m), to offer an excellent vantage point for at least one enterprising sightseer to get a birds-eye view of Titanic’s launch. As well as including a statue of Prince Albert also boasts a number of ornately carved crowned lions, angels, gargoyles and floral decorations. Its bell weighs 2 tonnes and can be heard from over 8 miles away.
macedonboy (20 months ago)
The Albert Memorial Clock Tower is a monument in memory of Queen Victoria's late Prince Consort, Prince Albert. This is one of the landmarks of Belfast, partly because of it imitation of the leaning of Pisa. As others have mentioned, the tower has a lean because it was built of wooden piles on marshy land. The tower has a distinctly Gothic architectural style with it's souring lines, especially nearer the base with arches mimicking the arches of a ceiling. At the front, facing away from the river is a statue of Albert in a regal portrait pose. All around the tower are ornately carved crowned lions, angels, gargoyles and floral decorations. Definitely worth seeing if in Belfast.
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