The Ulster Museum, located in the Botanic Gardens in Belfast, has around 8,000 square metres of public display space, featuring material from the collections of fine art and applied art, archaeology, ethnography, treasures from the Spanish Armada, local history, numismatics, industrial archaeology, botany, zoology and geology. It is the largest museum in Northern Ireland.

The Ulster Museum was founded as the Belfast Natural History Society in 1821 and began exhibiting in 1833. It has included an art gallery since 1890. Originally called the Belfast Municipal Museum and Art Gallery, in 1929, it moved to its present location in Stranmillis. The new building was designed by James Cumming Wynne.

The museum contains significant finds from Northern Ireland, although in earlier periods these were often sent to the British Museum or later Dublin, as with the Broighter Hoard, now in the National Museum of Ireland. Objects in the museum include the Malone Hoard of 19 polished Neolithic axe heads, the Moss-side Hoard of Mesolithic stone tools, the important Downpatrick Hoard of Bronze Age gold jewellery, part of the Late Roman Coleraine Hoard, the Viking Shanmullagh Hoard, and the medieval coins in the Armagh City Hoard and Armagh Castle Street Hoard.

There are other significant objects of the Bronze Age gold jewellery for which Ireland is notable, including four of the 100-odd surviving gold lunulae, and some important early Celtic art, including a decorated bronze shield found in the River Shannon, and the Bann Disk, bronze with triskele decoration.

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Details

Founded: 1929
Category: Museums in United Kingdom

More Information

www.nmni.com
en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michelle Jacobs (2 years ago)
Great museum, exhibits that cover all different areas (art, history, nature). Entrance is by donation. We only got through about half of the museum, there is a lot to see and we would definitely come back on a different visit!
Marcella Ch (2 years ago)
Surprisingly big. Exhibitions are interesting and the interactive aspects are very fun. Botanic Gardens are very pretty.
Raneem Hijazi (2 years ago)
Educational, informative, and a really nice historical museum. We enjoyed our tour there. There are so many things to see and know about! Highly recommend!
Tommy Van de Wouwer (2 years ago)
Really nice musuem with art, history and nature elements. Free to visit. Closed on Monday, open all other days. The museum is situated in the botanic gardens, also nice to visit! I spend about 1.5 hour admiring the exhibition's. There are also several discovery centers with a strong focus on smaller children and activities to do like drawing or experiments.
Ioannis Antonakis (3 years ago)
It's a nice little museum, definitely worth a visit (if you like museums of course). The fact that it's small is great, because you get to see everything and it doesn't take up too much time. They have interesting things to see and it's free to visit.
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