Montmaurin Gallo-Roman Villa

Montmaurin, France

The Gallo-Roman villa of Montmaurin dates from the first centuryies AD. The most ancient part, the residential section, now open to the public, dates from the 1st century. It was extended and enhanced in the 4th century then remained occupied until the early 6th century. The area where the accommodation and farming outbuildings (forges, brick and tile production, weaving, etc.) stood stretched to the southeast of the bath wing.

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Address

D9D, Montmaurin, France
See all sites in Montmaurin

Details

Founded: 1st century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

More Information

www.villa-montmaurin.fr

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bouzzan 31 (3 years ago)
Visite fabuleuse, guide passionnant, vue magnifique sur les Pyrénées pour une des plus belles villas antiques d'Europe.
Aline Cordier (3 years ago)
Une sensation étrange : lieu magique et émouvant certes mais... Comme si le maximum n'était pas encore réalisé..
Heather Knight (4 years ago)
Great roman ruin still had bits of marble clinging to the walls. Very easy to imagine its original form. Small sheet of paper with site info. No artifacts. No museum.
Michael Speller (5 years ago)
Interesting site. Well worth a visit.Beautiful area
Arold Schers (6 years ago)
Very nice Villa with good comments on paper. Lovely!!
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